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Assumption

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Originally delivered on August 15, 1993

Readings: Revelation 11:19; 12:1-6, 10; Corinthians 15:20-26; Luke 1: 39-56

In this homily, we hear a reflection of Jesus’ response to woman that yelled out “Blest is the womb that bore you and the breasts that nursed you!”  In response, He said, “Rather, blest are they who hear the word of God and keep it.” Fr. Healy asks us to consider that Mary’s willingness to hear God’s word and carry out His will is her true gift to us so that we might emulate her actions.  


Easter

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Readings: Genesis: 1:1-2.2; Genesis 22:1-18; Matthew 28:1-10

Originally delivered on April 15, 1990

We are joyful today because the Easter people know that God’s strength and triumph is greater than any death.  We will experience and taste death in countless ways, but we will persevere because of our God.  We are encouraged to see our Easter blessings even in the depths of our despair.

Passion Sunday

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Readings: Isaiah 50: 4-7; Philippians 2:6-11; Matthew 26:14-27, 66

Originally delivered on April 8, 1990

How can we understand those that called for Jesus’s death?  How are we like them?  Like them, do we think that we are doing the right thing?  Or do we shrink at the thought of standing up for what we know is right? That is, what are our motivations for what we do? Indeed, part of the human condition perhaps, is that we are not always at our best.  But, we must pray to God to be accepting of our human limitations and that we may have more courage to stand up for a cause that makes the world better.

5th Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on April 1, 1990

33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on November 16, 1986

 

Readings: Malachi 3:19-20; Thessalonians 3:7-12; Luke 21: 5-19

 

In today’s Gospel, we are once again reminded that we must follow Jesus, despite the fact that many obstacles will confront us precisely for what we believe and do based on those beliefs.  We, in a sense, bear a burden as Christians.  We are reminded of the 1986 Pastoral Letter on Catholic Social Teaching and the U.S. Economy, Haiti, and affordable housing as current day happenings (then and now) that challenge us to act on behalf of our sisters and brothers, the poor.

30th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on October 26, 1986

Readings: Sirach 35:12-14, 16-18; Paul to Timothy 4:6-8, 16-18; and Luke 18:9-14

In this week’s Gospel we hear the parable of the Pharisee and the tax collector. We are reminded today that everything that we do should be done in a Christian spirit and in the name of Jesus.  Through the parable, we are invited to examine the prayerfulness of our own lives.  In Jesus’ time, the Pharisees were seen as the most righteous and the tax collector was seen as the lowest, greediest kind of person.  And yet, the tax collector asks for and receives God’s mercy. We hear about Bishop Hunthausen’s courage, despite the institutional church, to stand up for social justice. Through this homily, we are reminded that although we belong to the Church, only adhering to the rules of the institutional structure, like the Pharisee in the parable, doesn’t justify us in the eyes of God.  But rather, we must try everyday to be a people devoted to Jesus, make mistakes, but know that we can ask and receive God’s mercy. If we’ve made the choice to follow Jesus, then we’ve committed ourselves to be a struggling people – a people devoted to helping the poor.

27th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on October 5, 1986

Readings: Habakkuk 1:2-3, 2, 2-4; Paul to Timothy 1:6-8, 13-14; Luke 17:5-10

We hear in today’s homily that we should not look for appreciation and gratitude from others, but rather take actions based on the Gospel.  Our faith can give us strength and courage even when others oppose and undermine us. Furthermore, we must love those opponents as Jesus loves each of us, even giving HIs life for us. The Eucharist is our thanks, the perfect thanks,from God the Creator.  If we can remember to give thanks to God, we can find the strength to carry on as Christian people, whether or not anyone else ever appreciates us.  Let us be faithful not for reward, but because faith is its own reward.