Cycle A

1st Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on March 4, 1990

Readings: Genesis 2:7-9, 3:1-7; Romans 5:12-19 or 5:12, 17-19; Matthew 4:1-11

In today’s readings we hear about the Garden of Eden, Jesus’ forty days in the desert, and His temptation by the devil.  We are reminded that God created the right order of things in His creation of the Garden of Eden, but like Jesus, we each experience our time in the desert, struggling with every demon.  We would do well to remember that Jesus went before us and will always be with us, as God’s people. But with Jesus’ support and love, we are each called to re-create the right order of things.  This means that we must experience the desert and our temptations, such as our desire for things and power, and trust in our God. To do this requires our penance, but most importantly, responsibility to make the future different.

5th Sunday of Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on February 8, 1987

Readings: Isaiah 58:7-10 (73A); 1 Corinthians 2:1-5; Matthew 5:13-16

In this week’s homily, Fr. Healy reflects on his experiences as a missionary in Tanzania.  He hopes for a day when every person would feel and believe that would believe that they “are the light of the world” and “the salt of the earth.” He invites us to think about to whom Jesus spoke those words.  Just as He did then, He is indeed speaking to us, as the ordinary people.  This means that we who have heard these words are meant to be a difference to a suffering world. We are reminded of the responsibilities of being called and the examples that we’ve seen in our parish and community of taking action.

4th Sunday of Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on January 31, 1993

Readings: Zephaniah 2:3; 3:12-13; 1 Corinthians 1:26-31; Matthew 5:1-12a

In this homily, we remember the passing of Justice Thurgood Marshall.  The first African-American member of the Supreme Court, he challenged the status quo and represented the poor and marginalized.  Perhaps he was considered a thorn in the side of the establishment, just as Jesus must have been considered by His contemporaries. In this week’s Gospel, we hear Jesus from the mountain, just as Moses gave the ten commandments from the mount, giving us the Beatitudes which were so very different in nature than the straightforward ten commandments.  But who are the poor in Spirit? Poverty in Spirit surely means genuine dependence on and trust in the Lord.  But being poor in Spirit also may mean those with material wealth who stand with the poor, the disadvantaged, and the marginalized. In doing so, we will be rich in God’s love.

 

Baptism of the Lord

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Originally delivered on January 10, 1993

Readings: Isaiah 42:1-4, 6-7; Acts 10:34-38; Matthew 3:13-17

Through a touching Healy family story, we glean new insight about why Jesus was baptized. Perhaps he wanted to identify with us, as much as possible — with our difficulties, shame, and sin which is all washed away in Baptism.  He wanted to be one with us in our struggle.  When we are at our most frail, Jesus, through His own Baptism, has shown us that He is truly with us.  Just as we should be with our oppressed sisters in brothers, especially those that don’t yet know about Jesus.

 

3rd Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 13, 1992

Readings: Isaiah 2:1-5; Romans 13:11-14; Matthew 24:37-44

In this week’s homily, Fr. Healy argues that Bible is a revolutionary message on behalf of the poor. In the first ready, Isaiah is picturing the glory of our Lord.  We are asked to consider the plight of the poor, such as a Somali woman, hearing those words. Would we feel abandoned or swindled by our sisters and brothers? Perhaps for this reason it was dangerous to have slaves or the poor learn to read for fear of them reading the Bible.  It is meant to be an energizer to the the poor and oppressed to stand up to claim their rightful place as God’s children. Indeed, this could be an historic moment for each of us, to decide to give the message to the poor and then to work to make that message come true for our marginalized sisters and brothers.

2nd Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 10, 1989

Readings: Isaiah 11:1-10; Romans 15:4-9; Matthew 3:1-12

In this homily, we hear of the death of Fr. Healy’s sister, Sally, and Pope John Paul II’s warning of the impending ecological crisis.  Animated about the issues of racism, refugees from Central America, and Haiti, Fr. Healy shares his struggle about which issues to address with the people of God. We are asked to hear the words of John the Baptist, as if he was speaking directly to each of us when he say’s “prepare ye the way of the Lord.  Make straight His path.” May we make a resolution to not be content to enjoy any of the blessings of God’s creation without a daily consciousness of how our use of God’s gifts affects the lives of our sisters and brothers.

 

 

 

1st Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 3, 1989

Readings: Isaiah 2:1-5; Romans 13:11-14; Matthew 24:37-44

Now is the time for us to take action.  In a passionate homily, even more so than usual, Fr. Healy encourages us to be participants and seize the sacred moment, and to turn our swords into plowshares. Let us put on the armor of light that is Jesus Christ. Now is the hour, for us to work for peace, love, and fellowship with our sisters and bothers throughout the world. We are reminded of the martyrs from El Salvador and Nicaragua, including Archbishop Romero, who were slain in the name of peace.  Let the blood of these martyrs to propel each of us to be peacemakers in our time.

19th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on August 8, 1993

Readings: Kings: 19:9, 11-13; Romans 9:1-5; Matthew 14:22-33

In today’s readings, we are challenged to see God in our midst.  In the Gospel, Jesus appears and approaches his disciples while walking on the water.  Peter, in his human frailty, begins to sink when he is invited to walk on the water with Jesus.  But Jesus, in a wonderful showing of his humanity, simply reaches out and catches Peter.  From our scripture readings today, we know that there are precious few people that see God in all of His splendor.  For the remainder of us, God is present in the faces and actions of our sisters and brothers. In this homily, we are reminded of the floods in the Mississippi and the tornadoes in Petersburg, VA not because of the natural disasters themselves, but because of the tremendous response from others who offered their help.

The Assumption

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Originally delivered on August 15, 1993

Readings: Revelation 11:19; 12:1-6, 10; Corinthians 15:20-26; Luke 1: 39-56

In this homily, we hear a reflection of Jesus’ response to woman that yelled out “Blest is the womb that bore you and the breasts that nursed you!”  In response, He said, “Rather, blest are they who hear the word of God and keep it.” Fr. Healy asks us to consider that Mary’s willingness to hear God’s word and carry out His will is her true gift to us so that we might emulate her actions.

 

Assumption

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Originally delivered on August 15, 1993

Readings: Revelation 11:19; 12:1-6, 10; Corinthians 15:20-26; Luke 1: 39-56

In this homily, we hear a reflection of Jesus’ response to woman that yelled out “Blest is the womb that bore you and the breasts that nursed you!”  In response, He said, “Rather, blest are they who hear the word of God and keep it.” Fr. Healy asks us to consider that Mary’s willingness to hear God’s word and carry out His will is her true gift to us so that we might emulate her actions.