Act Like Christ

32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

Readings: Kings 17:10-16; Hebrews 9:24-28; Mark 12:38-44

Originally delivered on November 10, 1991

Fr. Healy begins this homily with a family story of his Aunt Kate.  In this Gospel from Mark we hear how to live, and not live, a religious life.  Indeed, we are called to give, like the widow, from our “substance” rather than just what is comfortable. We are therefore challenged to allow ourselves to respond to human situations not from what is practical, but what our hearts tell us to do.  Are we giving from our substance? If so, then we never have to fear how it looks to more practical people. We are already forgiven by God, but are we living as though we’ve heard Jesus’s message that our actions toward our sisters and brothers in need? 

 

 

30th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Jeremiah 31:7-9; Hebrews 5:1-6; Mark 10:46-52

Originally delivered on October 23, 1988

Today, we are asked to consider what God is saying to us in this week’s readings.  In this first reading we hear what will be given to the chosen people.  Then, the gospel tells of a public healing of a blind man. We must struggle in our imperfection and wrestle with our conscience to try to bring about the kingdom of God in our midst. If we look at the present reality with the vision that God provides in the scriptures, then we will begin to agitate with our imperfect criticism to bring the world more in line with Jesus’s plan for the world. We may be walking in blindness, but we must remember that Jesus is always with us. What do we want Jesus to do for us?  Do we want to see?

29th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Isaiah 53:10-11; Hebrews 4:14-16; Mark 10:35-45

Originally delivered on October 20, 1991

In today’s homily, Fr. Healy reminds us that the not only does God exist, but that God loves us as we are.  Jesus became human, and as it says in the second reading, he was tempted but never sinned, and yet, we are always forgiven.  Indeed, Fr. Healy passionately insists that God doesn’t just have love and mercy, but is love and mercy. And yet, we are not able to merely rest on that love because, as we hear in the gospel, we also have a responsibility to care for our sisters and brothers.  We are called to let go of earthly things (e.g., money and power) and be servants to others until everyone in the family has a fair share of God’s blessings. 

20th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Proverbs: 9:1-6; Ephesians 5:15-20; John 6:51-58

Originally delivered on August 14, 1994

In this week’s Gospel, Jesus again tells us that He is the Bread of Life.  In the first reading, Fr. Healy points out that God is referred to as feminine. Our thinking, therefore, is challenged by Jesus, in both the first and Gospel readings, to let Him be our food and drink so that we might respond in His Spirit to our current realities.

10th Sunday of Ordinary Time

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Readings: Genesis 3:9-15; Corinthians 4:13-5:1; Mark 3:20-35

Originally delivered on June 9, 1991

Today we are asked to let go of our excuses for our failings and sins. We are also challenged to work to transform the earth to be that envisioned by Jesus. Fr. Healy passionately urges us to consider how racism still exists and to find our voices and take action to eliminate this sin in our society.

 

Corpus Christi

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Readings: Exodus: 24: 3-8; Hebrews: 9:11-15; Mark 14:12-15, 22-26

Originally delivered on June 6, 1988

In today’s homily, Fr. Healy reminds us that we all carry burdens, but in Jesus we can be free of our burdens. Because of His willingness to die for us, we are already forgiven for our sins. If we really understand Jesus, then we must understand that Jesus is going to ask us to risk many things, but through our weekly communion, we will find the strength from Him because Jesus has already paid the ultimate price for us.

Trinity Sunday

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Readings: Deuteronomy 4:32-34, 39-40; Romans 8:14-17; Matt 28:16-20

Originally delivered on May 29, 1988

In this week’s homily, we are reminded that the importance of the Trinity is that it shows our God is in community with us. God is not alone, distant, judgmental, etc. but rather God loves us and is involved and in communication with us. We are therefore called to be involved with our sisters and brothers.