Poor

30th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Jeremiah 31:7-9; Hebrews 5:1-6; Mark 10:46-52 

Originally delivered on October 27, 1991

In the first reading, we hear an expression of hope among the Jews for the coming of the Messiah.  In the gospel, we heat that the Messiah has come in Jesus. Through Him, we are asked to renounce money, comfort, possessions, things, power, prestige, place, etc. We are called to give up security, give to the poor, and follow Jesus.  We should long to be a servant and friend to the poor and marginalized. Indeed, we must see and act as every other person is our sister or brother. Do we really want to see as Jesus sees?

 

Christ the King

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Originally delivered on November 22, 1987

Readings: Ezekial 34:11-12, 15-17; Corinthians 15:20-26, 28; Matthew 25: 31-46

In today’s Gospel, Fr. Healy says that Jesus tells us the bottom line.  That is, we will be judged by how we treated the “least” among us. Do we put things before the needs of our sisters and brothers?  Indeed, we are called to do more for the marginalized, poor, and ostracized. We are all supposed to stand as equals in front of our God.

3rd Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 13, 1992

Readings: Isaiah 2:1-5; Romans 13:11-14; Matthew 24:37-44

In this week’s homily, Fr. Healy argues that Bible is a revolutionary message on behalf of the poor. In the first ready, Isaiah is picturing the glory of our Lord.  We are asked to consider the plight of the poor, such as a Somali woman, hearing those words. Would we feel abandoned or swindled by our sisters and brothers? Perhaps for this reason it was dangerous to have slaves or the poor learn to read for fear of them reading the Bible.  It is meant to be an energizer to the the poor and oppressed to stand up to claim their rightful place as God’s children. Indeed, this could be an historic moment for each of us, to decide to give the message to the poor and then to work to make that message come true for our marginalized sisters and brothers.

30th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on October 30, 1989

Readings: Sirach 35:12-14, 16-18; Paul to Timothy 4:6-8, 16-18; and Luke 18:9-14

Fr. Healy begins this homily by discussing the death of his beloved sister, Sally.  Through the experience of Sally’s death, the Healy family gatthered to share favorite family stories, including who among the many Healy children, was the favorite. In today’s gospel we are reminded that the least among us are loved most by God. Furthermore, Fr. Healy reminds us that we are to be the one that shows the marginalized that God loves them.  We must be God’s presence in this world to our brothers and sisters. Indeed, God demands this of us in our acts and deeds and we must lay aside our comparisons with others.

25th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on September 20, 1992

Readings: Amos 8:4-7; Paul to Timothy 2:1-8; Luke 16: 1-13 or 16:10-13

In today’s homily, we hear about the danger of money and worldly possessions.  In the second reading, we hear that we should pray for those with power and authority over others, so that all may live in tranquility and dignity.  Delivered in the midst of the 1992 US election, Fr. Healy preaches that the call of the prophets and Jesus, in today’s readings, is to ensure that all people be included in the wealth and riches of the earth.  Our challenge is to make this mean something in practical terms for our own lives, as children of the Light.  Fr. Healy talks passionately about the need for caring for our brothers and sisters in Haiti. We are asked to review what we do everyday, within our parish, community, country, hemisphere, and world for we are all brothers and sisters.

 

4th Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on March 25, 1990

Readings: Samuel 16:1, 6-7, 19-13; Ephesians 5:8-14; John 9:1-41

If only we could see as Jesus sees.  In today’s Gospel, Jesus heals the blind man due to his faith.  Though he used the example of physical healing, in this reading, we are shown that Jesus has already given us the gift of vision to see the world as God sees.   In our own time, we have prophets, such as Archbishop Oscar Romero, who have had the vision, in the depths of their beings, to experience the plight of the poor.

4th Sunday of Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on January 31, 1993

Readings: Zephaniah 2:3; 3:12-13; 1 Corinthians 1:26-31; Matthew 5:1-12a

In this homily, we remember the passing of Justice Thurgood Marshall.  The first African-American member of the Supreme Court, he challenged the status quo and represented the poor and marginalized.  Perhaps he was considered a thorn in the side of the establishment, just as Jesus must have been considered by His contemporaries. In this week’s Gospel, we hear Jesus from the mountain, just as Moses gave the ten commandments from the mount, giving us the Beatitudes which were so very different in nature than the straightforward ten commandments.  But who are the poor in Spirit? Poverty in Spirit surely means genuine dependence on and trust in the Lord.  But being poor in Spirit also may mean those with material wealth who stand with the poor, the disadvantaged, and the marginalized. In doing so, we will be rich in God’s love.