Poor

33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on November 16, 1986

 

Readings: Malachi 3:19-20; Thessalonians 3:7-12; Luke 21: 5-19

 

In today’s Gospel, we are once again reminded that we must follow Jesus, despite the fact that many obstacles will confront us precisely for what we believe and do based on those beliefs.  We, in a sense, bear a burden as Christians.  We are reminded of the 1986 Pastoral Letter on Catholic Social Teaching and the U.S. Economy, Haiti, and affordable housing as current day happenings (then and now) that challenge us to act on behalf of our sisters and brothers, the poor.

30th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on October 26, 1986

Readings: Sirach 35:12-14, 16-18; Paul to Timothy 4:6-8, 16-18; and Luke 18:9-14

In this week’s Gospel we hear the parable of the Pharisee and the tax collector. We are reminded today that everything that we do should be done in a Christian spirit and in the name of Jesus.  Through the parable, we are invited to examine the prayerfulness of our own lives.  In Jesus’ time, the Pharisees were seen as the most righteous and the tax collector was seen as the lowest, greediest kind of person.  And yet, the tax collector asks for and receives God’s mercy. We hear about Bishop Hunthausen’s courage, despite the institutional church, to stand up for social justice. Through this homily, we are reminded that although we belong to the Church, only adhering to the rules of the institutional structure, like the Pharisee in the parable, doesn’t justify us in the eyes of God.  But rather, we must try everyday to be a people devoted to Jesus, make mistakes, but know that we can ask and receive God’s mercy. If we’ve made the choice to follow Jesus, then we’ve committed ourselves to be a struggling people – a people devoted to helping the poor.

1st Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on February 12, 1989

Readings: Deuteronomy 26:4-10; Letter of Paul to the Romans 10:8-13; Luke 4:1-13

On this first Sunday of Lent, Fr. Healy talks about tithing and it’s importance as a practical need to care for our brothers and sisters. We are reminded by the Gospel reading that we should not be tempted by material security, desire for power over others, or relinquishing our responsibility to take action to improve our human condition. Through charity, especially when it is not just from our surplus, we show our love by caring for the poor, the needy, and the desperate.  

6th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on February 16, 1992

Readings: Jeremiah 17:5-8; Corinthians 15:12, 16-20; Luke 6:17, 20-26

In today’s Gospel, we are reminded of Jesus’ words “But woe to you rich, for your consolation is now.” As a member of one of the wealthiest nations, we are asked to look at our role in keeping the current arrangements that keep some people poor and hungry. We are also asked to think of marriage as an opportunity for two people to give themselves and their lives to their union as an expression of God Himself. 

3rd Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 15, 1991

Readings: Zephaniah 3:14-18; Philippians 4:4-7; Luke 3:10-18

Fr. Healy begins this homily reflecting on Pope John XXIII. We are reminded that God is always with us, despite our Advent prayers and celebrations for Jesus to come to again with all His power and glory.  We are challenged to ask ourselves what keeps us from feeling God among us.  We are therefore invited again to be intimate with God by being in relationship with our sisters and brothers.

 

30th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Jeremiah 31:7-9; Hebrews 5:1-6; Mark 10:46-52 

Originally delivered on October 27, 1991

In the first reading, we hear an expression of hope among the Jews for the coming of the Messiah.  In the gospel, we heat that the Messiah has come in Jesus. Through Him, we are asked to renounce money, comfort, possessions, things, power, prestige, place, etc. We are called to give up security, give to the poor, and follow Jesus.  We should long to be a servant and friend to the poor and marginalized. Indeed, we must see and act as every other person is our sister or brother. Do we really want to see as Jesus sees?

 

Christ the King

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Originally delivered on November 22, 1987

Readings: Ezekial 34:11-12, 15-17; Corinthians 15:20-26, 28; Matthew 25: 31-46

In today’s Gospel, Fr. Healy says that Jesus tells us the bottom line.  That is, we will be judged by how we treated the “least” among us. Do we put things before the needs of our sisters and brothers?  Indeed, we are called to do more for the marginalized, poor, and ostracized. We are all supposed to stand as equals in front of our God.