Calling

33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on November 16, 1986

 

Readings: Malachi 3:19-20; Thessalonians 3:7-12; Luke 21: 5-19

 

In today’s Gospel, we are once again reminded that we must follow Jesus, despite the fact that many obstacles will confront us precisely for what we believe and do based on those beliefs.  We, in a sense, bear a burden as Christians.  We are reminded of the 1986 Pastoral Letter on Catholic Social Teaching and the U.S. Economy, Haiti, and affordable housing as current day happenings (then and now) that challenge us to act on behalf of our sisters and brothers, the poor.

32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on November 8, 1992

 

Readings: Maccabees 7:1-2, 9-14; Thessalonians 2:16 -3:5; Luke 20:27-38 or 20-27 , 34-38

 

How does our conscience shape our actions? Are we, like the seven sons and their mother from the Book of Maccabees, willing to die for what we believe?  In today’s homily, we are reminded that we may have to take a stand for something which will become irrelevant at a later date.  Nonetheless, in the moment, we are called to follow our conscience.  We should pray dearly and act sincerely based on what our conscience tells us. On the issues of women priests, abortion, sexual orientation, divorce, and our economic systems, we must pray and ultimately follow our conscience.

26th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on September 20, 1992

Readings: Amos 6:1, 4-7; Paul to Timothy 6:11-16; Luke 16:19-31

We all have the same dilemma.  That is, if we really listen to the words of Jesus, it sounds impossible to follow him.  We are all probably, at our best, silent co-conspirators that keep poor people in their poverty. If we take today’s Scripture readings seriously, they are both challenging and somewhat frightening in their ramifications for how we live our lives. We are called, once again, not to be complacent when our sisters and brothers around the world are still hungry.  God is speaking to us today to not sit back and be complacent.  We should get restless and feel the frustration, as Jesus did, when he saw that some were cast aside and trampled on.  But, the sin in today’s Gospel is not being rich, but rather, being rich and indifferent to those around us.  

3rd Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on May 2, 1992

Readings: Acts of Apostles 5:27-32, 40-41; Revelation 5:11-14; John 21:1-19 or 21:1-14

In this homily, we hear of the tragedy of the riots in Los Angeles in 1992 and Fr. Healy’s struggle to understand the riots in light of the Easter allelujah that he felt during the season. From the first reading, we are reminded that we, like the apostles, sometimes may get into trouble doing the work that we are called to do. In the second reading, we hear again that Jesus will triumph. Finally, in the Gospel, through the story of Jesus meeting Peter fishing, we are reminded of Jesus’ forgiveness and our responsibility to serve others.  The racial riots in Los Angeles is another reason to know that we still have an unjust society and that we must confront those injustices if we say that we are true witnesses of Jesus. What are our present day events that show the injustices that remain?  How are we changing societal structures and ensuring that all people are included?  These are the questions that we must consistently ask ourselves as believers in Jesus’ Resurrection.

14th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Ezekiel 2:2-5; Corinthians 12: 7-10; Mark 6:1-6

Originally delivered on July 7, 1991

Fr. Healy reminds us today that we are each called to be a prophet. And yet we must sort out what we think and believe with what is truly God’s. We hear in the second reading that our humanity (sinfulness) does not excuse us from this calling of prophecy in the name of Jesus. In the gospel, through Jesus’s own experience, we know that prophets are not that well received at home where they are known.  We are also reminded that our most important ministry is to serve the needs of our sisters and brothers. We are asked to make personal the words in the first reading, “But you shall say to them: Thus says the Lord God! And whether they heed or resist – for they are a rebellious house – they shall know that a prophet has been among them.”

4th Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on March 13, 1988

Readings: Chronicles 36:14-17, 19-23; Ephesians 2:4-10; John 3:14-21

In today’s Gospel from John, we hear, “Everyone who practices evil hates the light; he does not come near it for fear his deeds will be exposed.  But he who acts in truth comes into the light, to make clear that his deeds are done in God.” Fr. Healy, through his own family story, reminds us how difficult it is to stand up for what we believe. Sometimes, we must give up the shelter and comfort of the hiding in the darkness.  Indeed, in today’s Gospel, we are called to stand in the light and stand up for truth.

28th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on October 10, 1993

Readings: Isaiah 25: 6-10; Philippians 4:12-14, 19-20; Matthew 22: 1-14 or 22:1-10

We are reminded today that we are all invited to the wedding banquet.  Today, we are asked, just as a bride and groom, to let go in order to more fully receive Jesus’ promise.   Each and every one of us is invited to the banquet of our Lord, without exception and without conditions, and yet, we are equally called to serve the fellow guests, our sisters and brothers.