Calling

5th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on February 9, 1992

Readings: Isaiah 6:1-2, 3-8; Corinthians 15:1-11 or 15:3-8,11; Luke 5:1-11

Although we are not worthy, we are called to be the Good News. In today’s Gospel, we hear that Peter is moved by the power of Jesus and then became a fisher of men and women.  Each of us, although unworthy, are called by God to use our talents in our vocation. We are reminded of the examples of Rep. Mickey Leland and Fr. Antoine Adrien who answered their calls to work towards ending hunger, poverty, and unjust government arrangements.  We are called to speak out and challenge the injustices that we see in our local communities and in the world.  Originally delivered in 1992, the issues of Haiti and healthcare are passionately given to us as examples of injustices that we can do something about.  Ironically, perhaps more than then, these issues and injustices still exist today. We aren’t worthy but we are forever called by Jesus  to do something.

3rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on January 26, 1992

Readings: Nehemiah 8:2-4, 5-6, 8-10; Corinthians 12:12-30; Luke 1:1-4, 4:14-21

In this week’s homily, we are asked to imagine that we are a Jew waiting for the Messiah in order to fully comprehend the power of the Gospel story where Jesus announces that he is the Messiah for whom the Jews had been waiting.  We are asked  to think about the part of us that wants the responsibility of living The Good News to be for someone else, but not ourselves.  Today, in the second reading, we are reminded that we are part of the body of Christ.  There is no insignificant part of the body.  As such, we must be the living Christ to our sisters in brothers around the world.  We are anointed.  We are called.  We will never have the perfection of Jesus. We will be misunderstood, rejected, ignored, or even stopped in our attempts, but we must continue to try. 

 

 

2nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on January 19, 1992

Readings: Isaiah 62:1-5; Corinthians 12:4-11; John 2:1-12

How will Isaiah’s words, “I will not be silent” propel us into action? In likely his most passionate homily, Fr. Healy reminds us to add our voices on behalf of the poor, especially those in Haiti, to bring about justice. We are reminded in this powerful homily of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King’s words: “We know through painful experience, that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor, but demanded by the oppressed…the question is not whether we will be extremists, but what kind of extremists we will be…”  We are asked to use our unique gifts from God, whatever those gifts might be, to be extremists to ensure that everyone will have a place at the table, making the prophesy of the Gospel come true.  We are each called.  How will we respond to that calling?

1st Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on March 4, 1990

Readings: Genesis 2:7-9, 3:1-7; Romans 5:12-19 or 5:12, 17-19; Matthew 4:1-11

In today’s readings we hear about the Garden of Eden, Jesus’ forty days in the desert, and His temptation by the devil.  We are reminded that God created the right order of things in His creation of the Garden of Eden, but like Jesus, we each experience our time in the desert, struggling with every demon.  We would do well to remember that Jesus went before us and will always be with us, as God’s people. But with Jesus’ support and love, we are each called to re-create the right order of things.  This means that we must experience the desert and our temptations, such as our desire for things and power, and trust in our God. To do this requires our penance, but most importantly, responsibility to make the future different.

2nd Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 10, 1989

Readings: Isaiah 11:1-10; Romans 15:4-9; Matthew 3:1-12

In this homily, we hear of the death of Fr. Healy’s sister, Sally, and Pope John Paul II’s warning of the impending ecological crisis.  Animated about the issues of racism, refugees from Central America, and Haiti, Fr. Healy shares his struggle about which issues to address with the people of God. We are asked to hear the words of John the Baptist, as if he was speaking directly to each of us when he say’s “prepare ye the way of the Lord.  Make straight His path.” May we make a resolution to not be content to enjoy any of the blessings of God’s creation without a daily consciousness of how our use of God’s gifts affects the lives of our sisters and brothers.

 

 

 

32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on November 8, 1992

 

Readings: Maccabees 7:1-2, 9-14; Thessalonians 2:16 -3:5; Luke 20:27-38 or 20-27 , 34-38

 

How does our conscience shape our actions? Are we, like the seven sons and their mother from the Book of Maccabees, willing to die for what we believe?  In today’s homily, we are reminded that we may have to take a stand for something which will become irrelevant at a later date.  Nonetheless, in the moment, we are called to follow our conscience.  We should pray dearly and act sincerely based on what our conscience tells us. On the issues of women priests, abortion, sexual orientation, divorce, and our economic systems, we must pray and ultimately follow our conscience.

26th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on September 20, 1992

Readings: Amos 6:1, 4-7; Paul to Timothy 6:11-16; Luke 16:19-31

We all have the same dilemma.  That is, if we really listen to the words of Jesus, it sounds impossible to follow him.  We are all probably, at our best, silent co-conspirators that keep poor people in their poverty. If we take today’s Scripture readings seriously, they are both challenging and somewhat frightening in their ramifications for how we live our lives. We are called, once again, not to be complacent when our sisters and brothers around the world are still hungry.  God is speaking to us today to not sit back and be complacent.  We should get restless and feel the frustration, as Jesus did, when he saw that some were cast aside and trampled on.  But, the sin in today’s Gospel is not being rich, but rather, being rich and indifferent to those around us.  

3rd Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on March 18, 1990

Readings: Exodus 17:3-7; Romans 5:1-2, 5-8; John 4:5-42 or 4:5-15, 19-26, 39, 40-42

Through Jesus, who offers us the water of eternal life, we are asked to struggle with creation, turning bad things to good, and making deserts into fruitful places by making water available to our thirsty sisters and brothers.  In Jesus’ conversation with the Samarian woman, we are given an example of our calling to be involved in and be sensitive to the thirst of others, despite our differences and whatever those differences may be.

3rd Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 17, 1989

Readings: Isaiah 35:1-6, 10; James 5:7-10; Matthew 1:2-11

Today we are reminded to Rejoice!  Rejoice for our being prophets to bring Jesus’ Gospel to our sisters and brothers here on Earth. We are each called to be prophets despite our frailties, doubts, and even our sins.   It is in our infirmity that the Glory of God becomes more evident. So, today as we rejoice in the Good News, we are each challenged to be true prophets in our actions.

33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on November 16, 1986

 

Readings: Malachi 3:19-20; Thessalonians 3:7-12; Luke 21: 5-19

 

In today’s Gospel, we are once again reminded that we must follow Jesus, despite the fact that many obstacles will confront us precisely for what we believe and do based on those beliefs.  We, in a sense, bear a burden as Christians.  We are reminded of the 1986 Pastoral Letter on Catholic Social Teaching and the U.S. Economy, Haiti, and affordable housing as current day happenings (then and now) that challenge us to act on behalf of our sisters and brothers, the poor.