Calling

28th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted on

Originally delivered on October 10, 1993

Readings: Isaiah 25: 6-10; Philippians 4:12-14, 19-20; Matthew 22: 1-14 or 22:1-10

We are reminded today that we are all invited to the wedding banquet.  Today, we are asked, just as a bride and groom, to let go in order to more fully receive Jesus’ promise.   Each and every one of us is invited to the banquet of our Lord, without exception and without conditions, and yet, we are equally called to serve the fellow guests, our sisters and brothers.

26th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted on Updated on

Originally delivered on September 27, 1987

Readings: Ezekial 18: 25-28; Philippians 2:1-11 or 2:1-5; Matthew 21:28-32

In today’s Gospel, Jesus speaks to us again in a parable about a son who says he’ll do something for his father and doesn’t while another son who refuses, but eventually does what is asked. Fr. Healy suggests that we are likely more like the first son because while we say “yes” we haven’t really put that yes into action on behalf of our Father. We might look around who are saying yes to Jesus by the way that they are living their lives. Indeed, we might look to the experiences within our own country.  How do we reconcile our Constitution with the fact that we had slavery for so long, waited more than a century for women to get the right to vote, or still engage in capital punishment?  In our own personal lives, how do we go beyond our “yes” to doing the real work that we are called to do.  Saying yes to Jesus, means risking ourselves, our wealth, and perhaps even getting into a little bit of trouble.  We must get out into the field and empty ourselves for our brothers and sisters.

 

26th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted on Updated on

Originally delivered on September 30, 1990

Readings: Ezekial 18: 25-28; Philippians 2:1-11 or 2:1-5; Matthew 21:28-32

Today Jesus speaks to us again in a parable about a son who says he’ll do something for his father and doesn’t while another son who refuses, but eventually does what is asked.  Fr. Healy discusses how we are each like the first son when we accept the call of Jesus and yet we often find it difficult to carry out that promise. There are others , such as Mitch Snyder, who don’t accept any structures or institutions, but then go on to serve their brothers and sisters, in the spirit that Jesus calls us all.  But we are also asked to think of those that go through the motions of faith, but then don’t live the Gospel in their daily actions and habits. We might remember all the amens that we’ve given and reconsider those that we might discard, but who do great works on behalf of our less fortunate sisters and brothers.

18th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted on Updated on

Originally delivered on August 5, 1990

Readings:  Isaiah 55: 1-3; Romans 8:35, 37-39; Matthew 14:13-21

This week’s Gospel is the famous story of five loaves of bread and a couple of fish.  In this account, his disciples suggest that Jesus disperse the crowd of 5,000 because they couldn’t feed them.  But Jesus objects and says, “There is no need for them to disperse. Give them something to eat themselves.”  All were fed and many of us, over the years, have marveled at the miracle.  But in today’s homily, Fr. Healy asks us to consider the possibility that Jesus was showing us that if we share what we have with our brothers and sisters, there will be plenty for all.

5th Sunday of Easter

Posted on

Originally delivered on May 9, 1993

Readings: Acts 6:1-7; Peter 2: 4-9; John 14:1-12

In today’s Gospel we are reminded about our own Christian challenge through the disciple Thomas.  Fr. Healy reminds us that we are a priestly people called to be His consecrated people on earth, both in the Gospels and in Vatican II.  We must seek, therefore, to bring harmony wherever there is strife throughout the world. Perhaps, like Thomas, we prefer to be confused, or to hope that others, including the Church hierarchy, will solve the world’s problems.  But we are holy people, a royal nation, to give back all that is His.

5th Sunday of Ordinary Time

Posted on

Originally delivered on February 7, 1993

Readings: Isaiah 58:7-10 (73A); 1 Corinthians 2:1-5; Matthew 5:13-16

In today’s Gospel, Jesus is challenging each of us to determine what our gifts and talents are, but more importantly, how we are using those gifts.  If we are the salt of the earth, then how is the special salt in each of us, the light of Jesus, meant to flavor the greater community? From Isaiah, we hear that we must “share our bread with the hungry, shelter the oppressed and the homeless; clothe the naked when you see them, and do not turn your back on your own.” That is, we are called by Jesus, to let our light shine, but for the poor, the oppressed, and the hungry.  We might ask ourselves, in light of this day’s readings, how we are recognizing and changing the continual oppression of women, African-Americans, and gays and lesbians. Jesus is calling each of us to let our unique light shine for our sisters and brothers.

2nd Sunday of Ordinary Time

Posted on Updated on

Originally delivered on January 17, 1993

Readings: Isaiah 49:3, 5-6; 1 Corinthians 1:1-3; John 1:29-34

We are a frail people, and yet, we are asked to walk in the likes of John the Baptist and the other prophets, and be a light to all.  We are reminded that there are prophets in our time as we celebrate the life of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Despite all of our faults, just as the prophets before us, we can speak the truth of Jesus.  Each of us must take action, in whatever we can, and not leave it up to others to change the order of things that keep many of sisters and brothers suffering. God has placed the incomprehensible burden of freedom in our hands. To embrace Jesus means that each of us must embrace everyone as a child of God.