Passion

Passion Sunday

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Originally delivered on April 4, 1993

Readings: Isaiah 50: 4-7; Philippians 2:6-11; Matthew 26:14-27, 66

How can we ever understand the people’s choice of releasing Barabbas over Jesus?  Fr. Healy challenges us to see similar situations in our lives where we, the people, choose Barrabas. Indeed, when we live in a society that maximizes a right or benefit for a few at the expense of the many, we are living in a time when the people still choose Barabbus.  Indeed, the Passion is still with us today.  We are encouraged to recognize, acknowledge, and repent for our collective sins, when we chose Barabbus, even in our complicity. Jesus, the Son of god, is in the most desperate person among us.  The choice is ours how we will respond.

23rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on September 6, 1992

Readings: Wisdom 9:13-18; Paul to Philemon 9-10, 12-17; Luke 14:25-33

We are reminded of the importance of reviewing the readings each week in preparation for the anticipated Mass.  In the first reading, our plight is defined: how will we ever live our lives so that we are doing God’s will? In the second reading, we hear about Paul and his prudence and in the gospel, we hear of Jesus’s desire for us to be both passionate and practical.  Fr. Healy talks about the challenge that we each face in pursuing something passionately, but still with the need to be practical and prudent in doing so.  What is God’s will versus our will?  That is exactly our struggle.

Passion Sunday

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Readings: Isaiah 50: 4-7; Philippians 2:6-11; Matthew 26:14-27, 66

Originally delivered on April 8, 1990

How can we understand those that called for Jesus’s death?  How are we like them?  Like them, do we think that we are doing the right thing?  Or do we shrink at the thought of standing up for what we know is right? That is, what are our motivations for what we do? Indeed, part of the human condition perhaps, is that we are not always at our best.  But, we must pray to God to be accepting of our human limitations and that we may have more courage to stand up for a cause that makes the world better.