Women

6th Sunday of Easter

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Readings: Acts 10:25-26, 34-35, 44-48, John 4:7-10, John 15:9-17

Originally delivered on May 5, 1991

In the first reading, we hear of Peter’s struggles to understand God’s vision for inclusiveness and welcomes non-Jews into the new Church. Then, in the second reading, we are reminded that we don’t need to earn God’s love.  God is love and god already loves us as we are.  We are asked to try to love one another as God loves us. In the Gospel, Jesus says, “there is no greater love than this: to lay down one’s life for one’s friends” and “The command I give you is this: that you love one another.” What might we need to give up in order to more fully embrace God’s calling to love one another as He loves us?

Easter

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Reading: Matthew 28:1-10 (although this is the wrong Gospel for this year)

Originally delivered April 3, 1994

Through his humor, Fr. Healy reminds us of the power of laughter.  We should be happy and laugh because we are Easter people.  Indeed, God calls upon us to persevere in spite of whatever is going on around or to us.

26th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on September 27, 1987

Readings: Ezekial 18: 25-28; Philippians 2:1-11 or 2:1-5; Matthew 21:28-32

In today’s Gospel, Jesus speaks to us again in a parable about a son who says he’ll do something for his father and doesn’t while another son who refuses, but eventually does what is asked. Fr. Healy suggests that we are likely more like the first son because while we say “yes” we haven’t really put that yes into action on behalf of our Father. We might look around who are saying yes to Jesus by the way that they are living their lives. Indeed, we might look to the experiences within our own country.  How do we reconcile our Constitution with the fact that we had slavery for so long, waited more than a century for women to get the right to vote, or still engage in capital punishment?  In our own personal lives, how do we go beyond our “yes” to doing the real work that we are called to do.  Saying yes to Jesus, means risking ourselves, our wealth, and perhaps even getting into a little bit of trouble.  We must get out into the field and empty ourselves for our brothers and sisters.

 

Easter

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Readings: Genesis: 1:1-2.2; Genesis 22:1-18; Matthew 28:1-10

Originally delivered on April 11, 1993

On this Easter Sunday, we are encouraged to be a joyful people despite our human condition or frailty.  We must remember that Jesus’s apostles loved Him so much and yet disappointed Him so much.  There are atrocities in our world, but we must remember that there have been some Easter people in our midst and have translated their hallelujahs into deeds. We must do the same.

Passion Sunday

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Originally delivered on April 4, 1993

Readings: Isaiah 50: 4-7; Philippians 2:6-11; Matthew 26:14-27, 66

How can we ever understand the people’s choice of releasing Barabbas over Jesus?  Fr. Healy challenges us to see similar situations in our lives where we, the people, choose Barrabas. Indeed, when we live in a society that maximizes a right or benefit for a few at the expense of the many, we are living in a time when the people still choose Barabbus.  Indeed, the Passion is still with us today.  We are encouraged to recognize, acknowledge, and repent for our collective sins, when we chose Barabbus, even in our complicity. Jesus, the Son of god, is in the most desperate person among us.  The choice is ours how we will respond.

4th Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on March 21, 1993

Readings: Samuel 16:1, 6-7, 19-13; Ephesians 5:8-14; John 9:1-41

In this day’s Gospel, we hear that Jesus singles out a blind man to be the most favored by God’s love and power.  Indeed, Jesus wants us to have a new vision and to see things very differently.  We are called to see that we are part of a large family of God. Fr. Healy challenges us to re-examine the US role in central America and the role men in keeping women marginalized.

32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on November 8, 1992

 

Readings: Maccabees 7:1-2, 9-14; Thessalonians 2:16 -3:5; Luke 20:27-38 or 20-27 , 34-38

 

How does our conscience shape our actions? Are we, like the seven sons and their mother from the Book of Maccabees, willing to die for what we believe?  In today’s homily, we are reminded that we may have to take a stand for something which will become irrelevant at a later date.  Nonetheless, in the moment, we are called to follow our conscience.  We should pray dearly and act sincerely based on what our conscience tells us. On the issues of women priests, abortion, sexual orientation, divorce, and our economic systems, we must pray and ultimately follow our conscience.