Social Justice

17th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted on Updated on

Originally delivered on July 29, 1990

Readings: Kings 3:5, 7-12; Romans 8: 28-30; Matthew 13:44-52 or 13:44-46

Fr. Healy begins this homily with a few favorite Healy family stories. We are encouraged to treasure those things that are really valuable in the eyes of God. In the first reading, Solomon asks for understanding.  In the Gospel, we hear that “the reign of God is also like a dragnet thrown into the lake, which collected all sorts of things.”  We are challenged to think about whether we care more about people and human relationships over things, success, or fame? Do we subscribe to structures and agreements that keep some of our sisters and brothers marginalized?

4th Sunday of Lent

Posted on Updated on

Originally delivered on March 21, 1993

Readings: Samuel 16:1, 6-7, 19-13; Ephesians 5:8-14; John 9:1-41

In this day’s Gospel, we hear that Jesus singles out a blind man to be the most favored by God’s love and power.  Indeed, Jesus wants us to have a new vision and to see things very differently.  We are called to see that we are part of a large family of God. Fr. Healy challenges us to re-examine the US role in central America and the role men in keeping women marginalized.

2nd Sunday of Lent

Posted on Updated on

Originally delivered on March 7, 1993

Readings: Genesis 12:1-4; Timothy 1:8-10; Matthew 17:1-9

In today’s Gospel, we, like the apostles, get a glimpse of the glory of God.  We hear today that our God will bring us from our deepest depths to our highest heights.  Perhaps, during this season of Lent, we need to encouragement to keep going by hearing and seeing the glory of God.  It’s a respite that reignites our passion to work for God’s vision here on earth by reaching out and loving our sisters and brothers, without exception.

3rd Sunday of Advent

Posted on

Originally delivered on December 13, 1992

Readings: Isaiah 2:1-5; Romans 13:11-14; Matthew 24:37-44

In this week’s homily, Fr. Healy argues that Bible is a revolutionary message on behalf of the poor. In the first ready, Isaiah is picturing the glory of our Lord.  We are asked to consider the plight of the poor, such as a Somali woman, hearing those words. Would we feel abandoned or swindled by our sisters and brothers? Perhaps for this reason it was dangerous to have slaves or the poor learn to read for fear of them reading the Bible.  It is meant to be an energizer to the the poor and oppressed to stand up to claim their rightful place as God’s children. Indeed, this could be an historic moment for each of us, to decide to give the message to the poor and then to work to make that message come true for our marginalized sisters and brothers.

2nd Sunday of Advent

Posted on Updated on

Originally delivered on December 6, 1992

Readings: Isaiah 2:1-5; Romans 13:11-14; Matthew 24:37-44

In today’s homily, we are invited to take a mountain view.  We are challenged to go from the comfortable to someplace new from which to gain a new perspective. We hear in the the first reading of Isaiah’s vision of what might be although it seems as if his vision can never happen.  We are reminded that this vision can only be possible after we hear, respond, and commit ourselves to justice among our sisters and brothers. Are we waiting for God or others to do justice before we commit and act for justice?  What if people, because of us, stop dreaming?  Today, we’re invited to go to the mountaintop, get a new perspective, and then bring about a little less injustice in our world through our actions.

26th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted on Updated on

Originally delivered on September 20, 1992

Readings: Amos 6:1, 4-7; Paul to Timothy 6:11-16; Luke 16:19-31

We all have the same dilemma.  That is, if we really listen to the words of Jesus, it sounds impossible to follow him.  We are all probably, at our best, silent co-conspirators that keep poor people in their poverty. If we take today’s Scripture readings seriously, they are both challenging and somewhat frightening in their ramifications for how we live our lives. We are called, once again, not to be complacent when our sisters and brothers around the world are still hungry.  God is speaking to us today to not sit back and be complacent.  We should get restless and feel the frustration, as Jesus did, when he saw that some were cast aside and trampled on.  But, the sin in today’s Gospel is not being rich, but rather, being rich and indifferent to those around us.  

25th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted on

Originally delivered on September 20, 1992

Readings: Amos 8:4-7; Paul to Timothy 2:1-8; Luke 16: 1-13 or 16:10-13

In today’s homily, we hear about the danger of money and worldly possessions.  In the second reading, we hear that we should pray for those with power and authority over others, so that all may live in tranquility and dignity.  Delivered in the midst of the 1992 US election, Fr. Healy preaches that the call of the prophets and Jesus, in today’s readings, is to ensure that all people be included in the wealth and riches of the earth.  Our challenge is to make this mean something in practical terms for our own lives, as children of the Light.  Fr. Healy talks passionately about the need for caring for our brothers and sisters in Haiti. We are asked to review what we do everyday, within our parish, community, country, hemisphere, and world for we are all brothers and sisters.