Social Justice

23rd Sunday of Ordinary Time

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Readings: Isaiah 35: 4-7; James 2: 1-5; Mark 7:31-37

Originally delivered on September 4, 1988

In this week’s homily, we are challenged to be open to hear the cries of the poor, hungry, or otherwise marginalized.  These are our sisters and brothers.  In the Gospel, Jesus tells us to be open to the saving wisdom of God. We must ask ourselves what we might be blind to see.  Are we participating in a system that keeps some of our sisters and brothers in a more difficult state and the impression that some are better than others? Jesus calls us to be open to a new vision of faith, to hear the cry of the poor, to have the courage to speak out.

23rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Isaiah 35: 4-7; James 2: 1-5; Mark 7:31-37

Originally delivered on September 8, 1991

We are reminded today to be open to the gifts that God brings to us that are willing to receive. Furthermore, we are called today to embrace the vision of Jesus that says that the last will be first.  We hear of the hope for a newly emerging Russia in this homily, but are cautioned to remember that a narrow focus on the individual can lead astray from Jesus’s message. Let us be a liberator of others because, like Jesus, we let go of desires for ourselves.

18th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Exodus 16: 2-4, 12-15; Ephesians 4:17, 20-24; John 6:24-25

Originally delivered on August 4, 1991

Today we are called to abandon our practical living and to believe and trust in God. In the first reading, we hear about Moses and manna in the desert.  In the Gospel, Jesus says that He is the bread of life.  Fr. Healy passionately preaches that we, as followers of Jesus, must have faith in God and share our treasures, whatever those may be, with our needy sisters and brothers. We are called to be radical, even revolutionary, from the order that is in place if we are to create a just world.

17th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Kings: 4:42-42; Ephesians 4:1-6; John 6:1-15

Originally delivered on July 24, 1988

Today’s Gospel is the miracle of the loaves and fishes feeding 5,000. We are reminded that through this miracle, Jesus shows us that we already have more than enough for the hungry and the hurting. The solution is in our hands for our world’s problems. Fr. Healy challenges us to be bold and share our treasures with our marginalized and hungry sisters and brothers, both as individuals and as a nation. Are we living our espoused values?

 

16th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Jeremiah 23: 1-6; Ephesians 2: 13-18; Mark 6: 30-34

Originally delivered on July 21, 1991

In today’s Gospel, we hear a continuation of last week’s mission.  Jesus welcomed back the disciples from their mission as messengers of the Gospel. We hear about two recent deaths – one young person taken due to violence and another elderly member of the parish. Fr. Healy challenges those marginalized, particularly black Americans, to stand up and not take the blame for their oppression, but demand leadership. We hear in the first reading from Jeremiah, “Woe to the shepherds who mislead and scatter the flock of my pasture.” In the second reason, we hear that Jesus calls us to unity with one another. Our greatest gift is to be the family of God. We cannot rest until we become a family with all of our sisters and brothers. Indeed, we are called to be the bearer of this message.

13th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Wisdom: 1:13-15, 2:23-24; Corinthians 8:7, 9, 13-15; Mark 5: 21-43 or 5: 21-24, 35 – 43

Originally delivered on June 30, 1991

In today’s Gospel, we hear of Jesus bringing back a little girl from the dead.  Indeed, we are asked to believe in God as the one that can restore us to life.  And yet, in the end of the Gospel story, Jesus tells her family gathered to feed the girl.  In essence, we, like the little girl’s family, are called to care for our sisters and brothers. In the second reading we also hear, “The relief of others ought not to impoverish you; there should be a certain equality.  Your plenty at the present time should supply their need so that their surplus may in turn one day supply your need, with equality as the result.  It is written, ‘He who gathered much had no excess and he who gathered little had no lack.’” Fr. Healy reminds us that the key is in our sharing.

2nd Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 6,1987

Readings: Isaiah 40:1-5, 9-11; Peter 3:8-14; Mark 1:1-8

Are we too busy or preoccupied to be called to level mountains and fill valleys? Will we be spectators or will we, in fact, work to ensure justice and fairness?  We are called to prepare the way of the Lord.  We hear in today’s readings we hear that “In the Lord’s eyes, one day is a thousand years and a thousand years are as a day.”  That is, justice may not be done in our time, but in God’s time which is a mystery to us.  The only question is if we will work to be part of God’s plan for justice on earth.