Faith

3rd Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on March 14, 1993

Readings: Exodus 17:3-7; Romans 5:1-2, 5-8; John 4:5-42 or 4:5-15, 19-26, 39, 40-42

In today’s Gospel we are reminded that water is indeed vital to life.  In the first reading, the people who are angry at God are not a people who had never benefitted from the goodness of God and yet they complained.  In the Gospel story we hear of the water that lasts forever and yet the Samaritan woman does not fully understand Jesus’s words. In the second reading, we hear Paul remind of us of God’s love for us because Christ died for us.  Jesus died and we are redeemed.  That is our reality and yet, our challenge is to believe that we are already saved.

 

28th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on October 12, 1986

Readings: Kings 5:14-17; Paul to Timothy 2:8-13; Luke 17:11-19

There is no doubt about it — God can cure all human suffering, but His use of power is limited to opportunities to encourage our faith. The Scripture tells us that for the foreigners, God was willing to heal them, in order to help us to increase our faith and believe more in the Lord. We are called to grow in faith each day.  We are reminded that in 1986, the similarities between lepresy and AIDS were so evident.  Then, and now, we are called to be loving to all people just as Jesus loved the ten lepers in today’s Gospel.  Our God is not merciful, but rather God is Mercy. In His image, we are called to bring love and compassion to all those suffering with human afflictions. 

Read the Transcript: c28ot-10-12-86

27th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on October 8, 1989
Readings: Habakkuk 1:2-3, 2, 2-4; Paul to Timothy 1:6-8, 13-14; Luke 17:5-10

In today’s Gospel we hear of the importance of faith and confidence in God.  The message in today’s liturgy is powerful and burdensome: the God in whom we believe, does not intervene in this world, but He gives us the strength for each of us to act to make the world a more just place.  Fr. Healy cites several examples of individuals that worked to address issues of homelessness, AIDS, and sexism. We are called to do the same, but not for reward, but because faith is its own reward.

19th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Wisdom 18:6-9; Hebrews 11:1-2, 8-19; Luke 12:32-48

Originally delivered on August 13, 1989

In today’s homily, we hear about the family story of Abraham and Sarah and their son, Isaac. Through this story, we learn more about faith and are challenged to be like Abraham in listening to God, going to a place we don’t know, but are called to by God.  Then, in the gospel, we are told to let go, stop being so materialistic, and worried only about material things.  That is, we are to trust in God. We must ask ourselves if we truly trust in Jesus’s promise? Are we children of Abraham and Sarah in our actions? Finally, the gospel reminds us that “when much has been given a man, much will be required. More will be asked of a man to whom more has been entrusted.”

4th Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 24, 1989

Readings: Isaiah 7:10-14, 10; Romans 1:1-7; Matthew 1:18-24

In this week’s Gospel, we hear how the birth of Jesus came about.  Joseph said Amen to marrying Mary, despite the impossibility of understanding how the Son of God was to be born through Mary.  Two ordinary people, Mary and Joseph, had the faith to say Amen. May we do the same, no matter how scary it may seem.  Will we say, “Your Will be done in me”?

 

Christmas

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Originally delivered on December 24, 1988
Readings: Isaiah 62:1-5; Acts of the Apostles 13:16-17, 22-25; Matthew 1:1-25
In this Christmas message we hear of a story of a simple act rooted in selflessness that forever changed the life of another.  We’re also reminded of the power of believing.

 

27th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on October 5, 1986

Readings: Habakkuk 1:2-3, 2, 2-4; Paul to Timothy 1:6-8, 13-14; Luke 17:5-10

We hear in today’s homily that we should not look for appreciation and gratitude from others, but rather take actions based on the Gospel.  Our faith can give us strength and courage even when others oppose and undermine us. Furthermore, we must love those opponents as Jesus loves each of us, even giving HIs life for us. The Eucharist is our thanks, the perfect thanks,from God the Creator.  If we can remember to give thanks to God, we can find the strength to carry on as Christian people, whether or not anyone else ever appreciates us.  Let us be faithful not for reward, but because faith is its own reward.