Love

4th Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on May 2, 1993

Readings: Acts of the Apostles 2:14, 36-41; Peter 2:20-25; John 10:1-10
In this homily, Fr. Healy asks us which one of us wants to be referred to as sheep.  Any yet, the metaphor is used in today’s Gospel.  We are challenged to acknowledge just how dependent we are for God’s help, guidance, and Grace through Jesus. If we are open to His word, then we can hear Him and make courageous choices in our present world.  We are asked to “do what Jesus would do” when facing economic, social and even personal questions.  If we are members of Jesus’s flock, we must always return hatred and bitterness with kindness, compassion, love, and a willingness to let ourselves go in the name of peace and truth.

1st Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on February 28, 1993

Readings: Genesis 2:7-9, 3:1-7; Romans 5:12-19 or 5:12, 17-19; Matthew 4:1-11

We all struggle with a God who is love and mercy who also permits pain, suffering, and evil within His creation.  But through Jesus, we know that we are redeemed.  In spite of and in the midst of all the meanness, madness, and idiocy of human behavior, we are loved and forgiven for our shortcomings.

7th Sunday of Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on February 18, 1990

Readings: Leviticus 19:1-2, 17-18; Corinthians 3:16-23; Matthew 5:38-48

In the Sermon on the Mount, we are told that we must love our enemies and pray for our persecutors because we are to love just as our Heavenly Father loves us.  Although we may not be able to match God’s love in the same measure, we are nonetheless called to love in the same manner as Him.  This week in 1990, when the homily was originally delivered, marked the release of a prophet in our time, Nelson Mandela, from prison after 27 years.  His love and lack of animosity are a modern day reflection of the love that Jesus manifests for us and in today’s Gospel calls us to imitate.

30th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on October 30, 1989

Readings: Sirach 35:12-14, 16-18; Paul to Timothy 4:6-8, 16-18; and Luke 18:9-14

Fr. Healy begins this homily by discussing the death of his beloved sister, Sally.  Through the experience of Sally’s death, the Healy family gatthered to share favorite family stories, including who among the many Healy children, was the favorite. In today’s gospel we are reminded that the least among us are loved most by God. Furthermore, Fr. Healy reminds us that we are to be the one that shows the marginalized that God loves them.  We must be God’s presence in this world to our brothers and sisters. Indeed, God demands this of us in our acts and deeds and we must lay aside our comparisons with others.

28th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on October 12, 1986

Readings: Kings 5:14-17; Paul to Timothy 2:8-13; Luke 17:11-19

There is no doubt about it — God can cure all human suffering, but His use of power is limited to opportunities to encourage our faith. The Scripture tells us that for the foreigners, God was willing to heal them, in order to help us to increase our faith and believe more in the Lord. We are called to grow in faith each day.  We are reminded that in 1986, the similarities between lepresy and AIDS were so evident.  Then, and now, we are called to be loving to all people just as Jesus loved the ten lepers in today’s Gospel.  Our God is not merciful, but rather God is Mercy. In His image, we are called to bring love and compassion to all those suffering with human afflictions. 

Read the Transcript: c28ot-10-12-86

24th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Today we hear the homily on the Prodigal Son.  In the first reading, we hear of a vindictive God, ready to send fire down to the sinners. But in the Gospel, we hear from Jesus that God is indeed love and mercy.  How many times must we hear this parable to let it sink in?  How differently might we see ourselves if we trusted Jesus? If we were set free of our self-doubt and fear, how different we would be to our brothers and sisters. Delivered on the eve of the 1992 election, Fr. Healy speaks of the importance of the parable for that time where some were raised up by putting others down.  In light of this parable in the Gospel of Jesus Christ, how do we rationalize our actions that hurt others?

22nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on August 30,1992

Readings: Sir 3:17-18, 20, 28-29; Heb 12:18-19, 22-24a; Luke 14:1, 7-14

We are reminded that if we want to be great, we should celebrate with and praise the least attended to among us.  If we want to strive for humility, then we should celebrate the reflection of God within ourselves and our sisters and brothers, despite our unworthiness.  It is the mystery of God’s love that makes each of us special and unique.  The challenge for each of us is to give thanks to God for our gifts  By giving constant thanks to God, we achieve humility. But we cannot stop there.  We must also reach out to all of God’s people and use the gifts given to us by God to enrich their lives.  In turn, our own lives will be enlightened by the beauty of Jesus in the face of those “outsiders” that we embrace.