LGBT

4th Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on May 6, 1990

Readings: Acts of the Apostles 2:14, 36-41; Peter 2:20-25; John 10:1-10

Again today we hear about the Good Shepherd and his sheep. Fr. Healy invites us to wonder why that one sheep might have left the flock.  Could the flock have made it impossible to fit in?  But in this day’s readings, we hear that Jesus is the gatekeeper.  Others do not the have the right to keep some of the sheep out of the flock. Therefore, we have a responsibility to be like Jesus and always welcome others, and perhaps especially, the one sheep that has wondered off because of how the flock treats him or her.

3rd Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on April 25, 1993

Readings: Acts 2:14, 22-28; Peter 1:17-21; Luke 24: 13-35
Fr. Healy asks us to explore our own road to Emmaus; how we fail to see the risen Christ in those around us. We are challenged to open our hearts to those that are different from us.

32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on November 8, 1992

 

Readings: Maccabees 7:1-2, 9-14; Thessalonians 2:16 -3:5; Luke 20:27-38 or 20-27 , 34-38

 

How does our conscience shape our actions? Are we, like the seven sons and their mother from the Book of Maccabees, willing to die for what we believe?  In today’s homily, we are reminded that we may have to take a stand for something which will become irrelevant at a later date.  Nonetheless, in the moment, we are called to follow our conscience.  We should pray dearly and act sincerely based on what our conscience tells us. On the issues of women priests, abortion, sexual orientation, divorce, and our economic systems, we must pray and ultimately follow our conscience.

24th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Today we hear the homily on the Prodigal Son.  In the first reading, we hear of a vindictive God, ready to send fire down to the sinners. But in the Gospel, we hear from Jesus that God is indeed love and mercy.  How many times must we hear this parable to let it sink in?  How differently might we see ourselves if we trusted Jesus? If we were set free of our self-doubt and fear, how different we would be to our brothers and sisters. Delivered on the eve of the 1992 election, Fr. Healy speaks of the importance of the parable for that time where some were raised up by putting others down.  In light of this parable in the Gospel of Jesus Christ, how do we rationalize our actions that hurt others?

13th Sunday of Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on July 2, 1989

Readings: Kings 19: 16-21, Paul to the Galatians 5:1, 13-18; Luke 9: 51-62

In today’s homily, which begins with Fr. Healy singing an anthem, we hear of an oppressed people that risked everything for freedom.   In today’s readings, Paul says that “It was for liberty that Christ freed us.  So stand firm, and do not take yourselves the yoke of slavery a second time! My brothers, remember that you have been given freedom that give free rein to the flesh.  Out of love, place yourselves at one another’s service.”  And furthermore, it says, “You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”

Fr. Healy passionately states that this law of love, must triumph all other laws enacted by others. Indeed, this law of freedom and love is both liberating and frightening. Through a series of present-day challenges, we are challenged to view those issues through the lens of love and personal conscience. Our freedom hinges on our faith and responsibility to others.

 

16th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on July 18, 1993

Readings: Wisdom 12:13, 16-19; Romans 8:26-27; Matthew 13:24-43 or 13:24-30

In the first reading from the book of Wisdom, we are reminded of God’s unconditional forgiveness and compassion for us. How much do we hold onto the hurts that we’ve experienced?  But today, through the infusion of the Holy Spirit, we are asked to let go of these hurts, as God forgives us.  In the Gospel, Jesus challenges us to think of people as crops and weeds — the good and bad — and to pour our energy not into pulling weeds.  We should focus on ourselves and let God sort out the wheat from the weeds.  We are called, therefore, to be loving, compassionate, and forgiving as Jesus is to us. We are reminded of the courage of the six Jesuits killed in El Salvador in 1989, the debate of gays in the military, and the situation in Haiti as current events happening in 1993 that challenge us to not judge others lest we, one day, be judged by others to be a weed rather than the wheat.