Capital Punishment

5th Sunday of Lent

Posted on

5th Sunday of Lent

Originally delivered on April 1, 1990

Readings: Ezekial 37: 12-14; Romans 8:8-11; John 11:1-45

In today’s readings, we are reminded that God can restore life. We are reminded that through Jesus, there are no human experiences from which God can’t restore us.  He reflects on the life of Sr. Thea Bowman whose example shows us how to answer the call for new life. Furthermore, Fr. Healy reflects on the events in Sri Lanka and South Africa.  He urges us to risk our own lives so that life may be more full, more real for our sisters and brothers in our communities and around the world. But first, we must believe.

 

5th Sunday of Easter

Posted on

Originally delivered on May 17, 1992

Readings: Acts of the Apostles 14: 21-27, Revelation 21:1-5, and John 13:31-33, 34-35

In this week’s Gospel, we hear the story of the Last Supper, and specifically, how Judas missed it because he was too interested in the money that he was to receive for betraying Jesus. At each Eucharist, we are invited by Jesus to dedicate ourselves to others, just as Jesus dedicated Himself to us. We are asked how we are loving our sisters and brothers, just as Jesus loved us.  We are challenged to ask ourselves how are we helping the people of Haiti, what are we doing to stop the continuation of capital punishment, or how we are changing the lives of anyone in need. 

19th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted on Updated on

Readings: Kings: 19:4-8; Ephesians 4:30-5:2; John 6:41-51

Originally delivered on August 11, 1991

In today’s first reading, we hear about Elijah’s journey to the desert where God wakes him, feeds him, and commands him to keep going. In the Gospel, Jesus says that He is the Bread of Life. We are called to be the bread and nourishment for our sisters and brothers because of our commitment to the person and message of Jesus. Indeed, we are called by Paul in his letter to the Ephesians to “Get rid of all bitterness, all passion and anger, harsh words, slander, and malice of every kind. In place of these, be kind to one another, compassionate, and mutually forgiving, just as God has forgiven you in Christ.”

3rd Sunday of Easter

Posted on

Readings: Acts 5:12-16; Revelation 1:9-11, 12-13, 17-19; John 20:19-31

Originally delivered on April 17, 1994

In this homily, we are reminded that our sins are always forgiven.  Indeed, God is Mercy and Redemption.  It’s so amazing that it’s difficult for many of us to believe.  Nonetheless, we must try to reflect God’s forgiveness in how we treat one another.  We must love one another, just as God loves us.

 

2nd Sunday of Lent

Posted on

Originally delivered on February 27, 1994

Readings: Genesis 22:12, 9, 10-13, 15-18; Romans 8:31-34; Mark 9:2-10

In this homily, Fr. Healy focuses on the first reading from Genesis about God’s commandment to Abraham to kill his son, Isaac.  Fr. Healy contends that the point of the story is that God would never ask us to kill, but rather, that God would send His own Son, Jesus, to be the scapegoat for us all.  He passionately preaches that we must not ever kill our sisters and brothers, despite any rationale that is given. We, as followers of Jesus, must always choose life.

29th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted on

Originally delivered on October 21, 1990

Readings: Isaiah 45:1, 4-6; Thessalonians 1:1-5; Matthew 22:15-21

In today’s readings, we hear that all power is given by God only as a means of creating the Kingdom of God here on earth. How are those in power today helping to do just that?  How do we participate in that political process?  We must ask “What would Jesus do?” and then follow those answers of Jesus rather than what any politician might say.

27th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted on

Originally delivered on Oct 3, 1993

Readings: Isaiah 5:1-7; Philippians 4:6-9; Matthew 21:33-43

In this week’s Gospel, we hear another parable about a vineyard.  Today we hear about tenant farmers who brought forth beautiful grapes, but they thought it was their own doing and forgot about their responsibility to the vineyard owner. Fr. Healy reminds us that his theory is that the Gospel is meant to comfort and console as well as challenge us.  How do we tend the vineyard?  Do we sit on the sidelines and do nothing in the face of injustices in our world?  Let the same Jesus that comforts us, challenge us in this day’s reading to renew our effort to tend His vineyard.