Inclusion

28th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on October 10, 1993

Readings: Isaiah 25: 6-10; Philippians 4:12-14, 19-20; Matthew 22: 1-14 or 22:1-10

We are reminded today that we are all invited to the wedding banquet.  Today, we are asked, just as a bride and groom, to let go in order to more fully receive Jesus’ promise.   Each and every one of us is invited to the banquet of our Lord, without exception and without conditions, and yet, we are equally called to serve the fellow guests, our sisters and brothers.

20th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on August 19, 1990

Readings: Isaiah 56:1, 6-7; Romans 11:13-15, 29-32; Matthew 15:21-28

In this week’s Gospel, a Canaanite woman addresses Jesus and asks for His help.  Through her persistence, despite being a non-Jew, Jesus recognizes her faith and heals her daughter.  But first, Jesus, in his humanity, rebuffed the woman and, in fact, asked his disciples to get rid of her.  In this homily, Fr. Healy invites us to reflect on the humanity of Jesus reflected in today’s Gospel from Matthew.  In the first reading, Isaiah tells the Jews, and us today, that salvation is for all peoples.  All people are God’s people.  We are asked to examine our own lives to see how we’ve practiced exclusion, but then rise to the challenge of overcoming our sins, in the spirit of Jesus’s example.

18th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on August 5, 1990

Readings:  Isaiah 55: 1-3; Romans 8:35, 37-39; Matthew 14:13-21

This week’s Gospel is the famous story of five loaves of bread and a couple of fish.  In this account, his disciples suggest that Jesus disperse the crowd of 5,000 because they couldn’t feed them.  But Jesus objects and says, “There is no need for them to disperse. Give them something to eat themselves.”  All were fed and many of us, over the years, have marveled at the miracle.  But in today’s homily, Fr. Healy asks us to consider the possibility that Jesus was showing us that if we share what we have with our brothers and sisters, there will be plenty for all.

6th Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on May 16, 1993
Readings: Acts 8:5-8, 14-17; Peter 3:15-18; John 14:15-21
In this homily, Fr. Healy describes to us what it must have been like for the disciples after Jesus’s death, including their hopes, doubts, fears, and challenges.  In today’s Gospel, the disciples, like us, are challenged again to know that Jesus is with us through the Holy Spirit. Indeed, we are challenged to experience the Christ in our sisters and brothers.

4th Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on May 6, 1990

Readings: Acts of the Apostles 2:14, 36-41; Peter 2:20-25; John 10:1-10

Again today we hear about the Good Shepherd and his sheep. Fr. Healy invites us to wonder why that one sheep might have left the flock.  Could the flock have made it impossible to fit in?  But in this day’s readings, we hear that Jesus is the gatekeeper.  Others do not the have the right to keep some of the sheep out of the flock. Therefore, we have a responsibility to be like Jesus and always welcome others, and perhaps especially, the one sheep that has wondered off because of how the flock treats him or her.

3rd Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on April 25, 1993

Readings: Acts 2:14, 22-28; Peter 1:17-21; Luke 24: 13-35
Fr. Healy asks us to explore our own road to Emmaus; how we fail to see the risen Christ in those around us. We are challenged to open our hearts to those that are different from us.

Epiphany

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Originally delivered on January 4, 1987

Readings: Isaiah 60:1-6; Ephesians 3:2-3, 5-6; Matthew 2:1-12

In this homily on the Feast of the Epiphany, we hear that that most important line from the three readings is “God’s secret plan, as I have briefly described it, was revealed by the Spirit to the holy apostles and prophets.  It is no less than this: in Christ Jesus the Gentiles are now co-heirs with the Jews, members of the same body and sharers of the promise through the preaching of the gospel.”  As co-heirs, we must ask ourselves if we’ve also accepted the responsibility of sacrificing what we could have to ensure that our sisters and brothers have a place at the table?  Welcoming all, but especially the refugees and other foreigners, like the wise men were welcomed by the baby Jesus, is what we are called to do as Christians.

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