Inclusion

3rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on January 26, 1992

Readings: Nehemiah 8:2-4, 5-6, 8-10; Corinthians 12:12-30; Luke 1:1-4, 4:14-21

In this week’s homily, we are asked to imagine that we are a Jew waiting for the Messiah in order to fully comprehend the power of the Gospel story where Jesus announces that he is the Messiah for whom the Jews had been waiting.  We are asked  to think about the part of us that wants the responsibility of living The Good News to be for someone else, but not ourselves.  Today, in the second reading, we are reminded that we are part of the body of Christ.  There is no insignificant part of the body.  As such, we must be the living Christ to our sisters in brothers around the world.  We are anointed.  We are called.  We will never have the perfection of Jesus. We will be misunderstood, rejected, ignored, or even stopped in our attempts, but we must continue to try. 

 

 

2nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on January 19, 1992

Readings: Isaiah 62:1-5; Corinthians 12:4-11; John 2:1-12

How will Isaiah’s words, “I will not be silent” propel us into action? In likely his most passionate homily, Fr. Healy reminds us to add our voices on behalf of the poor, especially those in Haiti, to bring about justice. We are reminded in this powerful homily of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King’s words: “We know through painful experience, that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor, but demanded by the oppressed…the question is not whether we will be extremists, but what kind of extremists we will be…”  We are asked to use our unique gifts from God, whatever those gifts might be, to be extremists to ensure that everyone will have a place at the table, making the prophesy of the Gospel come true.  We are each called.  How will we respond to that calling?

Baptism of the Lord

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Originally delivered on January 12, 1992

 

Readings: Isaiah 42:1-4, 6-7; Acts 10:34-38; Luke 3:15-16, 21-22

 

A Sacrament of initiation, Baptism, is more than a welcome to the Church. Baptism is an initiation into the family. In today’s homily, we are asked to acknowledge Baptism as a commissioning outward to share in the spirit of our family.  Everyone is family, and as such, we are asked to hold a world vision based on Jesus, who taught us tenderness toward each other and justice for all. As a family, we must embrace all people, without exception, and especially immigrants, refugees, and strangers.  All are welcome and all are one. Although we are baptized in water, we are also baptized in fire and spirit.  May God set us on fire to make the spirit of family alive in our world.

22nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on August 30,1992

Readings: Sir 3:17-18, 20, 28-29; Heb 12:18-19, 22-24a; Luke 14:1, 7-14

We are reminded that if we want to be great, we should celebrate with and praise the least attended to among us.  If we want to strive for humility, then we should celebrate the reflection of God within ourselves and our sisters and brothers, despite our unworthiness.  It is the mystery of God’s love that makes each of us special and unique.  The challenge for each of us is to give thanks to God for our gifts  By giving constant thanks to God, we achieve humility. But we cannot stop there.  We must also reach out to all of God’s people and use the gifts given to us by God to enrich their lives.  In turn, our own lives will be enlightened by the beauty of Jesus in the face of those “outsiders” that we embrace. 

21st Sunday in Ordinary Time

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21st Sunday in Ordinary Time

Readings: Isaiah 66: 18-21; Hebrews 12: 5-7, 11-13; Luke 13: 22-30

Originally delivered on August 27, 1989

Fr. Healy begins his homily with a funny story about the Holy Ghost Fathers. He reminds us that in today’s gospel, we are called to see everyone as part of the family of God.  This is the vision of Jesus.  Everyone is in, especially those that perhaps we would want to count out. Fr. Healy then brings the message to the current time by discussing the issues and laws that seem to count some people out.  As followers of Jesus, therefore, we must stand up against those things that hurt our brothers and sisters.

3rd Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on March 18, 1990

Readings: Exodus 17:3-7; Romans 5:1-2, 5-8; John 4:5-42 or 4:5-15, 19-26, 39, 40-42

Through Jesus, who offers us the water of eternal life, we are asked to struggle with creation, turning bad things to good, and making deserts into fruitful places by making water available to our thirsty sisters and brothers.  In Jesus’ conversation with the Samarian woman, we are given an example of our calling to be involved in and be sensitive to the thirst of others, despite our differences and whatever those differences may be.

Epiphany

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Originally delivered on January 4, 1987

Readings: Isaiah 60:1-6; Ephesians 3:2-3, 5-6; Matthew 2:1-12

In this homily on the Feast of the Epiphany, we hear that that most important line from the three readings is “God’s secret plan, as I have briefly described it, was revealed by the Spirit to the holy apostles and prophets.  It is no less than this: in Christ Jesus the Gentiles are now co-heirs with the Jews, members of the same body and sharers of the promise through the preaching of the gospel.”  As co-heirs, we must ask ourselves if we’ve also accepted the responsibility of sacrificing what we could have to ensure that our sisters and brothers have a place at the table?  Welcoming all, but especially the refugees and other foreigners, like the wise men were welcomed by the baby Jesus, is what we are called to do as Christians.

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Epiphany

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Originally delivered on January 8, 1995

Readings: Isaiah 60:1-6; Ephesians 3:2-3, 5-6; Matthew 2:1-12

Today we are reminded that there are strangers waiting to be welcome by us. They, the strangers, are also waiting to share their gifts with us. To what extent are we living in celebration of one another?

6th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on February 13, 1994

Readings: Leviticus 13:1-2, 44-46; Corinthians 10:31-11:1; Mark 1:40-45

The first and last readings today are about leprosy.  Fr. Healy suggests that we all have leprosy from time to time. Fr. Healy surmises that leprosy is something that scares, threatens, or makes someone feel insecure. Even those with “gifts” can be ostracized as a leper. We’ve all counted another “out”, so that we can be sure that we are “in.” We are challenged to look for God in the faces of those that we’d otherwise reject, including gays, lesbians, people living with HIV/AIDS, and those of different races or ethnicities.

1st Sunday in Advent

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Originally delivered on December 2, 1990

Readings: Isaiah 63: 16-17. 19; 64:2-7; Corinthians 1:3-9; Mark 13:33-37

At the beginning of Advent, we are, in effect, saying thank you Jesus and come again among us. He comes and renews us in each Eucharist and when two or three are gathered in His name.  Advent is a time to acknowledge God’s presence in our lives which gives us strength to carry on.  But it is also a time to remember that we should be on guard and ready for HIs coming again.  At the time of the original delivery, the US was weighing the possibility of the Gulf War.  We are asked to consider how our political enemies are also people of God.