Inclusion

6th Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on May 16, 1993
Readings: Acts 8:5-8, 14-17; Peter 3:15-18; John 14:15-21
In this homily, Fr. Healy describes to us what it must have been like for the disciples after Jesus’s death, including their hopes, doubts, fears, and challenges.  In today’s Gospel, the disciples, like us, are challenged again to know that Jesus is with us through the Holy Spirit. Indeed, we are challenged to experience the Christ in our sisters and brothers.

4th Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on May 6, 1990

Readings: Acts of the Apostles 2:14, 36-41; Peter 2:20-25; John 10:1-10

Again today we hear about the Good Shepherd and his sheep. Fr. Healy invites us to wonder why that one sheep might have left the flock.  Could the flock have made it impossible to fit in?  But in this day’s readings, we hear that Jesus is the gatekeeper.  Others do not the have the right to keep some of the sheep out of the flock. Therefore, we have a responsibility to be like Jesus and always welcome others, and perhaps especially, the one sheep that has wondered off because of how the flock treats him or her.

3rd Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on April 25, 1993

Readings: Acts 2:14, 22-28; Peter 1:17-21; Luke 24: 13-35
Fr. Healy asks us to explore our own road to Emmaus; how we fail to see the risen Christ in those around us. We are challenged to open our hearts to those that are different from us.

Epiphany

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Originally delivered on January 4, 1987

Readings: Isaiah 60:1-6; Ephesians 3:2-3, 5-6; Matthew 2:1-12

In this homily on the Feast of the Epiphany, we hear that that most important line from the three readings is “God’s secret plan, as I have briefly described it, was revealed by the Spirit to the holy apostles and prophets.  It is no less than this: in Christ Jesus the Gentiles are now co-heirs with the Jews, members of the same body and sharers of the promise through the preaching of the gospel.”  As co-heirs, we must ask ourselves if we’ve also accepted the responsibility of sacrificing what we could have to ensure that our sisters and brothers have a place at the table?  Welcoming all, but especially the refugees and other foreigners, like the wise men were welcomed by the baby Jesus, is what we are called to do as Christians.

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22nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on August 30,1992

Readings: Sir 3:17-18, 20, 28-29; Heb 12:18-19, 22-24a; Luke 14:1, 7-14

We are reminded that if we want to be great, we should celebrate with and praise the least attended to among us.  If we want to strive for humility, then we should celebrate the reflection of God within ourselves and our sisters and brothers, despite our unworthiness.  It is the mystery of God’s love that makes each of us special and unique.  The challenge for each of us is to give thanks to God for our gifts  By giving constant thanks to God, we achieve humility. But we cannot stop there.  We must also reach out to all of God’s people and use the gifts given to us by God to enrich their lives.  In turn, our own lives will be enlightened by the beauty of Jesus in the face of those “outsiders” that we embrace. 

21st Sunday in Ordinary Time

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21st Sunday in Ordinary Time

Readings: Isaiah 66: 18-21; Hebrews 12: 5-7, 11-13; Luke 13: 22-30

Originally delivered on August 27, 1989

Fr. Healy begins his homily with a funny story about the Holy Ghost Fathers. He reminds us that in today’s gospel, we are called to see everyone as part of the family of God.  This is the vision of Jesus.  Everyone is in, especially those that perhaps we would want to count out. Fr. Healy then brings the message to the current time by discussing the issues and laws that seem to count some people out.  As followers of Jesus, therefore, we must stand up against those things that hurt our brothers and sisters.

Christ the King

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Originally delivered on November 21, 1993

Readings: Ezekial 34:11-12, 15-17; Corinthians 15:20-26, 28; Matthew 25: 31-46

In this week’s Gospel, we hear the challenge to all people, but especially Christians, that we are called to care for our sisters and brothers. We are reminded that there is but one law — to love.  To love with all that we have without exception.  Although it’s simply stated, it’s very difficult for us to live, but that is both our calling and our challenge.  But Fr. Healy goes on to encourage us to look deeper into why some of our sisters and brothers are hungry, hurting, or marginalized.