Haiti

16th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on July 18, 1993

Readings: Wisdom 12:13, 16-19; Romans 8:26-27; Matthew 13:24-43 or 13:24-30

In the first reading from the book of Wisdom, we are reminded of God’s unconditional forgiveness and compassion for us. How much do we hold onto the hurts that we’ve experienced?  But today, through the infusion of the Holy Spirit, we are asked to let go of these hurts, as God forgives us.  In the Gospel, Jesus challenges us to think of people as crops and weeds — the good and bad — and to pour our energy not into pulling weeds.  We should focus on ourselves and let God sort out the wheat from the weeds.  We are called, therefore, to be loving, compassionate, and forgiving as Jesus is to us. We are reminded of the courage of the six Jesuits killed in El Salvador in 1989, the debate of gays in the military, and the situation in Haiti as current events happening in 1993 that challenge us to not judge others lest we, one day, be judged by others to be a weed rather than the wheat.

2nd Sunday of Easter

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Readings: Acts 2:42-47; Peter 1:3-9; John 20:1931

Originally delivered on April 26, 1987

In this week’s Gospel, the Risen Jesus appears to the disciples, but Thomas was not present and only believed when Jesus appeared to Thomas and showed him His wounds.  Just like us, Thomas had his doubts.  And yet, the words that Thomas proclaimed to Jesus were powerful, “My Lord and my God.”  In the first reading from the Acts of the Apostles, we hear that the apostles provided for one another based on their individual needs.  Indeed, we must be there for our brothers and sisters. When we search for the Risen Christ, do we find those in need or are we only aligning ourselves the oppressors?  We are, in fact, called to be the sign of the Risen Christ in our deeds.  Through all of these trials, like Thomas, we will have our doubts, but we must persist because Jesus will be with us.

Easter

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Readings: Genesis: 1:1-2.2; Genesis 22:1-18; Matthew 28:1-10

Originally delivered on April 15, 1990

We are joyful today because the Easter people know that God’s strength and triumph is greater than any death.  We will experience and taste death in countless ways, but we will persevere because of our God.  We are encouraged to see our Easter blessings even in the depths of our despair.

2nd Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 6, 1992

Readings: Isaiah 2:1-5; Romans 13:11-14; Matthew 24:37-44

In today’s homily, we are invited to take a mountain view.  We are challenged to go from the comfortable to someplace new from which to gain a new perspective. We hear in the the first reading of Isaiah’s vision of what might be although it seems as if his vision can never happen.  We are reminded that this vision can only be possible after we hear, respond, and commit ourselves to justice among our sisters and brothers. Are we waiting for God or others to do justice before we commit and act for justice?  What if people, because of us, stop dreaming?  Today, we’re invited to go to the mountaintop, get a new perspective, and then bring about a little less injustice in our world through our actions.

Pentecost

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Originally delivered on June 7, 1992

Readings: Acts of the Apostles 2:1-11; Paul to the Corinthians 12:3-7, 12-13; John 20:19-23

Fr. Healy reminds us that we have already received the Holy Spirit.  Perhaps not in the wind or the fire, but in the light and life of the diversity of our sisters and brothers.  Indeed, there are people throughout the world waiting for the fire within us to make a difference in their lives.  He reminds us of political events in Yugoslavia, Czechoslovakia, Thailand, Cambodia, China, and Haiti where people are waiting for the power of the Holy Spirit.  The message of Pentecost is not to be still and wait for God to save, but rather that we must be fire on the earth.

5th Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on May 17, 1992

Readings: Acts of the Apostles 14: 21-27, Revelation 21:1-5, and John 13:31-33, 34-35

In this week’s Gospel, we hear the story of the Last Supper, and specifically, how Judas missed it because he was too interested in the money that he was to receive for betraying Jesus. At each Eucharist, we are invited by Jesus to dedicate ourselves to others, just as Jesus dedicated Himself to us. We are asked how we are loving our sisters and brothers, just as Jesus loved us.  We are challenged to ask ourselves how are we helping the people of Haiti, what are we doing to stop the continuation of capital punishment, or how we are changing the lives of anyone in need. 

5th Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on April 2, 1995

Readings: Isaiah 43: 16-21; Philippians 3: 8-14; John 8:1-11

This week’s Gospel is the John’s account of the adulterer.  Fr. Healy invites us to reflect on whether sexual issues are highlighted in our society, perhaps as they were in Jesus’s time, to deflect our attention from other issues. We are reminded that Jesus speaks to us today when he tells the woman, “Nor do I condemn you.  You may go.  But from now on, avoid, the sin.” 

8th Sunday of Ordinary Time

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Readings: Sirach 27: 4-7; Corinthians 15: 54-58; Luke 6:39-45

Originally delivered on March 1, 1992

In today’s homily, we are reminded that listening and discerning is a difficult yet unending task that we are called to do.  Of course, we must be wary of liars, or intentional deceivers, but we must also be wary of those that speak untruths, but believe what they espouse.  We must test everything against the divine measure: does this resonate with the message and deeds of the Son of God.  May truth always be the treasure in our heart.

Presentation of the Lord

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Originally delivered on February 2, 1992

Readings: Malachi 3:1-4; Hebrews 2:14-18; Luke 2:22-40

On this Feast of the Presentation of the Lord, we are reminded that we will likely always experience highs as well as our lows. Our God comforts and challenges us. We must be ready to be servants of our God.

1st Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 1, 1991

Readings: Jeremiah 33:14-16; Thessalonians 3:12-4:2; Luke 21:25-28,34-36

Today we are reminded that when we gather for Eucharist, we are indeed a family with all that being family entails. On this first Sunday of Advent, we are reminded that we cannot rest, waiting for our Lord, when our sisters and brothers are still hurting.