Haiti

4th Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on May 6, 1990

Readings: Acts of the Apostles 2:14, 36-41; Peter 2:20-25; John 10:1-10

Again today we hear about the Good Shepherd and his sheep. Fr. Healy invites us to wonder why that one sheep might have left the flock.  Could the flock have made it impossible to fit in?  But in this day’s readings, we hear that Jesus is the gatekeeper.  Others do not the have the right to keep some of the sheep out of the flock. Therefore, we have a responsibility to be like Jesus and always welcome others, and perhaps especially, the one sheep that has wondered off because of how the flock treats him or her.

3rd Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on April 25, 1993

Readings: Acts 2:14, 22-28; Peter 1:17-21; Luke 24: 13-35
Fr. Healy asks us to explore our own road to Emmaus; how we fail to see the risen Christ in those around us. We are challenged to open our hearts to those that are different from us.

2nd Sunday of Easter

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Readings: Acts 2:42-47; Peter 1:3-9; John 20:1931

Originally delivered on April 26, 1987

In this week’s Gospel, the Risen Jesus appears to the disciples, but Thomas was not present and only believed when Jesus appeared to Thomas and showed him His wounds.  Just like us, Thomas had his doubts.  And yet, the words that Thomas proclaimed to Jesus were powerful, “My Lord and my God.”  In the first reading from the Acts of the Apostles, we hear that the apostles provided for one another based on their individual needs.  Indeed, we must be there for our brothers and sisters. When we search for the Risen Christ, do we find those in need or are we only aligning ourselves the oppressors?  We are, in fact, called to be the sign of the Risen Christ in our deeds.  Through all of these trials, like Thomas, we will have our doubts, but we must persist because Jesus will be with us.

Passion Sunday

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Originally delivered on April 4, 1993

Readings: Isaiah 50: 4-7; Philippians 2:6-11; Matthew 26:14-27, 66

How can we ever understand the people’s choice of releasing Barabbas over Jesus?  Fr. Healy challenges us to see similar situations in our lives where we, the people, choose Barrabas. Indeed, when we live in a society that maximizes a right or benefit for a few at the expense of the many, we are living in a time when the people still choose Barabbus.  Indeed, the Passion is still with us today.  We are encouraged to recognize, acknowledge, and repent for our collective sins, when we chose Barabbus, even in our complicity. Jesus, the Son of god, is in the most desperate person among us.  The choice is ours how we will respond.

3rd Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 13, 1992

Readings: Isaiah 2:1-5; Romans 13:11-14; Matthew 24:37-44

In this week’s homily, Fr. Healy argues that Bible is a revolutionary message on behalf of the poor. In the first ready, Isaiah is picturing the glory of our Lord.  We are asked to consider the plight of the poor, such as a Somali woman, hearing those words. Would we feel abandoned or swindled by our sisters and brothers? Perhaps for this reason it was dangerous to have slaves or the poor learn to read for fear of them reading the Bible.  It is meant to be an energizer to the the poor and oppressed to stand up to claim their rightful place as God’s children. Indeed, this could be an historic moment for each of us, to decide to give the message to the poor and then to work to make that message come true for our marginalized sisters and brothers.

2nd Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 6, 1992

Readings: Isaiah 2:1-5; Romans 13:11-14; Matthew 24:37-44

In today’s homily, we are invited to take a mountain view.  We are challenged to go from the comfortable to someplace new from which to gain a new perspective. We hear in the the first reading of Isaiah’s vision of what might be although it seems as if his vision can never happen.  We are reminded that this vision can only be possible after we hear, respond, and commit ourselves to justice among our sisters and brothers. Are we waiting for God or others to do justice before we commit and act for justice?  What if people, because of us, stop dreaming?  Today, we’re invited to go to the mountaintop, get a new perspective, and then bring about a little less injustice in our world through our actions.

1st Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on November 29, 1992

Readings: Isaiah 2:1-5; Romans 13:11-14; Matthew 24:37-44

In the week’s Gospel, Fr. Healy urges us to see the message that we are challenged, as God’s people, to get a “mountain view”.  That is, to see things as God does.  On this first Sunday of Advent, we are asked to look at ourselves, our lives, and this world from a whole new perspective. With Jesus as our anchor, we can, in fact, get a new perspective and to find the courage to hope and to change things. We only have a finite amount of time in our lives to make these changes.  We don’t know what the hereafter might be so we must seize the opportunity now to see the world as God sees the world.  It may cost us something, but it’s what God’s calling for us to do, and what Jesus is calling us to do through this day’s readings.  We are called to consecrate the earth, share with others, and loving each others as brothers and sisters. That’s the view from the mountain that we are challenged to see, accept, and act upon.