Conscience

32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on November 8, 1992

 

Readings: Maccabees 7:1-2, 9-14; Thessalonians 2:16 -3:5; Luke 20:27-38 or 20-27 , 34-38

 

How does our conscience shape our actions? Are we, like the seven sons and their mother from the Book of Maccabees, willing to die for what we believe?  In today’s homily, we are reminded that we may have to take a stand for something which will become irrelevant at a later date.  Nonetheless, in the moment, we are called to follow our conscience.  We should pray dearly and act sincerely based on what our conscience tells us. On the issues of women priests, abortion, sexual orientation, divorce, and our economic systems, we must pray and ultimately follow our conscience.

13th Sunday of Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on July 2, 1989

Readings: Kings 19: 16-21, Paul to the Galatians 5:1, 13-18; Luke 9: 51-62

In today’s homily, which begins with Fr. Healy singing an anthem, we hear of an oppressed people that risked everything for freedom.   In today’s readings, Paul says that “It was for liberty that Christ freed us.  So stand firm, and do not take yourselves the yoke of slavery a second time! My brothers, remember that you have been given freedom that give free rein to the flesh.  Out of love, place yourselves at one another’s service.”  And furthermore, it says, “You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”

Fr. Healy passionately states that this law of love, must triumph all other laws enacted by others. Indeed, this law of freedom and love is both liberating and frightening. Through a series of present-day challenges, we are challenged to view those issues through the lens of love and personal conscience. Our freedom hinges on our faith and responsibility to others.

 

31st Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on October 31, 1993

Readings: Malachi 1:14-2:2, 8-10; Thessalonians 2:7-9, 13; Matthew 23:1-12

In this homily, Fr. Healy discusses the significance of Vatican II, the Church in Haiti, and those that are marginalized by the institutional Church. He characterizes Vatican II as revolutionary and a calling for us to be part of the universal Church in both spirit and responsibility. We are reminded that our conscience is the ultimate law of morality because it is our sacred inner core where we meet God.  We must remember that Jesus responded that the two greatest commandments were to love God and to love our neighbor as ourselves.