Responsibility

32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

Readings: Kings 17:10-16; Hebrews 9:24-28; Mark 12:38-44

Originally delivered on November 10, 1991

Fr. Healy begins this homily with a family story of his Aunt Kate.  In this Gospel from Mark we hear how to live, and not live, a religious life.  Indeed, we are called to give, like the widow, from our “substance” rather than just what is comfortable. We are therefore challenged to allow ourselves to respond to human situations not from what is practical, but what our hearts tell us to do.  Are we giving from our substance? If so, then we never have to fear how it looks to more practical people. We are already forgiven by God, but are we living as though we’ve heard Jesus’s message that our actions toward our sisters and brothers in need? 

 

 

30th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Jeremiah 31:7-9; Hebrews 5:1-6; Mark 10:46-52 

Originally delivered on October 27, 1991

In the first reading, we hear an expression of hope among the Jews for the coming of the Messiah.  In the gospel, we heat that the Messiah has come in Jesus. Through Him, we are asked to renounce money, comfort, possessions, things, power, prestige, place, etc. We are called to give up security, give to the poor, and follow Jesus.  We should long to be a servant and friend to the poor and marginalized. Indeed, we must see and act as every other person is our sister or brother. Do we really want to see as Jesus sees?

 

29th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Isaiah 53:10-11; Hebrews 4:14-16; Mark 10:35-45

Originally delivered on October 20, 1991

In today’s homily, Fr. Healy reminds us that the not only does God exist, but that God loves us as we are.  Jesus became human, and as it says in the second reading, he was tempted but never sinned, and yet, we are always forgiven.  Indeed, Fr. Healy passionately insists that God doesn’t just have love and mercy, but is love and mercy. And yet, we are not able to merely rest on that love because, as we hear in the gospel, we also have a responsibility to care for our sisters and brothers.  We are called to let go of earthly things (e.g., money and power) and be servants to others until everyone in the family has a fair share of God’s blessings. 

10th Sunday of Ordinary Time

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Readings: Genesis 3:9-15; Corinthians 4:13-5:1; Mark 3:20-35

Originally delivered on June 9, 1991

Today we are asked to let go of our excuses for our failings and sins. We are also challenged to work to transform the earth to be that envisioned by Jesus. Fr. Healy passionately urges us to consider how racism still exists and to find our voices and take action to eliminate this sin in our society.

 

4th Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on March 13, 1988

Readings: Chronicles 36:14-17, 19-23; Ephesians 2:4-10; John 3:14-21

In today’s Gospel from John, we hear, “Everyone who practices evil hates the light; he does not come near it for fear his deeds will be exposed.  But he who acts in truth comes into the light, to make clear that his deeds are done in God.” Fr. Healy, through his own family story, reminds us how difficult it is to stand up for what we believe. Sometimes, we must give up the shelter and comfort of the hiding in the darkness.  Indeed, in today’s Gospel, we are called to stand in the light and stand up for truth.

1st Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on February 20, 1994

Readings: Genesis 9:8-15; Peter 3:18-22; Mark 1:12-15

In today’s first reading, we hear about God’s use of the rainbow as a sign that God’s promise to always be there for us. God is promising us that we will never be abandoned.  We are challenged to recognize that perhaps the rainbow is a symbol of God’s plan for our diversity and that we are called to be the face of God to our sisters and brothers.  Like Jesus in the desert, we will face hardship, but God’s promise will see us through those times, just as Jesus endured the 40 days.

1st Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on February 17, 1991

Readings: Genesis 9:8-15; Peter 3:18-22; Mark 1:12-15

In today’s first reading from Genesis, we hear that God gave us the rainbow as a sign that God would never again flood the earth.  Fr. Healy suggests that the story of Noah gives us the message that no matter how terrible things may be, there will always be a new day, filled with new possibilities when God will triumph and will not fade away.  Indeed, God’s light will dispel all of the darkness. Those who believe, have the gift of faith, which will see them through the dark times. However, we must also be that hope for our sisters and brothers in need.  We must reach out, care for, and attend to all of God’s creation.