Responsibility

4th Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on March 13, 1988

Readings: Chronicles 36:14-17, 19-23; Ephesians 2:4-10; John 3:14-21

In today’s Gospel from John, we hear, “Everyone who practices evil hates the light; he does not come near it for fear his deeds will be exposed.  But he who acts in truth comes into the light, to make clear that his deeds are done in God.” Fr. Healy, through his own family story, reminds us how difficult it is to stand up for what we believe. Sometimes, we must give up the shelter and comfort of the hiding in the darkness.  Indeed, in today’s Gospel, we are called to stand in the light and stand up for truth.

1st Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on February 20, 1994

Readings: Genesis 9:8-15; Peter 3:18-22; Mark 1:12-15

In today’s first reading, we hear about God’s use of the rainbow as a sign that God’s promise to always be there for us. God is promising us that we will never be abandoned.  We are challenged to recognize that perhaps the rainbow is a symbol of God’s plan for our diversity and that we are called to be the face of God to our sisters and brothers.  Like Jesus in the desert, we will face hardship, but God’s promise will see us through those times, just as Jesus endured the 40 days.

1st Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on February 17, 1991

Readings: Genesis 9:8-15; Peter 3:18-22; Mark 1:12-15

In today’s first reading from Genesis, we hear that God gave us the rainbow as a sign that God would never again flood the earth.  Fr. Healy suggests that the story of Noah gives us the message that no matter how terrible things may be, there will always be a new day, filled with new possibilities when God will triumph and will not fade away.  Indeed, God’s light will dispel all of the darkness. Those who believe, have the gift of faith, which will see them through the dark times. However, we must also be that hope for our sisters and brothers in need.  We must reach out, care for, and attend to all of God’s creation.

Christ the King

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Originally delivered on November 22, 1987

Readings: Ezekial 34:11-12, 15-17; Corinthians 15:20-26, 28; Matthew 25: 31-46

In today’s Gospel, Fr. Healy says that Jesus tells us the bottom line.  That is, we will be judged by how we treated the “least” among us. Do we put things before the needs of our sisters and brothers?  Indeed, we are called to do more for the marginalized, poor, and ostracized. We are all supposed to stand as equals in front of our God.

33rd Sunday of Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on November 19, 1989

Readings: Malachi 3:19-20; Thessalonians 3:7-12; Luke 21: 5-19

In this week’s Gospel, we hear Fr. Healy’s anger and passion regarding the murder of fellow priest, Segundo Montes, S.J., in El Salvador just three days before the homily was delivered.  He goes on to talk about what the financial realities were with Duquesne University and the Washington Office on Haiti.  We are reminded that ten years earlier, Archbishop Oscar Romero was also murdered because he fought for the poor.  He goes on to remind us that this week’s Gospel tells us that horrible things will happen, including death for some. Despite these things, we are called to bear witness and to stand up for our sisters and brothers. Indeed, we must bring light to every area of government and society where injustice exists.  Are we willing to get into a little bit of trouble, in the name of Jesus?

30th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on October 30, 1989

Readings: Sirach 35:12-14, 16-18; Paul to Timothy 4:6-8, 16-18; and Luke 18:9-14

Fr. Healy begins this homily by discussing the death of his beloved sister, Sally.  Through the experience of Sally’s death, the Healy family gatthered to share favorite family stories, including who among the many Healy children, was the favorite. In today’s gospel we are reminded that the least among us are loved most by God. Furthermore, Fr. Healy reminds us that we are to be the one that shows the marginalized that God loves them.  We must be God’s presence in this world to our brothers and sisters. Indeed, God demands this of us in our acts and deeds and we must lay aside our comparisons with others.

19th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Wisdom 18:6-9; Hebrews 11:1-2, 8-19; Luke 12:32-48

Originally delivered on August 13, 1989

In today’s homily, we hear about the family story of Abraham and Sarah and their son, Isaac. Through this story, we learn more about faith and are challenged to be like Abraham in listening to God, going to a place we don’t know, but are called to by God.  Then, in the gospel, we are told to let go, stop being so materialistic, and worried only about material things.  That is, we are to trust in God. We must ask ourselves if we truly trust in Jesus’s promise? Are we children of Abraham and Sarah in our actions? Finally, the gospel reminds us that “when much has been given a man, much will be required. More will be asked of a man to whom more has been entrusted.”