Responsibility

33rd Sunday of Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on November 19, 1989

Readings: Malachi 3:19-20; Thessalonians 3:7-12; Luke 21: 5-19

In this week’s Gospel, we hear Fr. Healy’s anger and passion regarding the murder of fellow priest, Segundo Montes, S.J., in El Salvador just three days before the homily was delivered.  He goes on to talk about what the financial realities were with Duquesne University and the Washington Office on Haiti.  We are reminded that ten years earlier, Archbishop Oscar Romero was also murdered because he fought for the poor.  He goes on to remind us that this week’s Gospel tells us that horrible things will happen, including death for some. Despite these things, we are called to bear witness and to stand up for our sisters and brothers. Indeed, we must bring light to every area of government and society where injustice exists.  Are we willing to get into a little bit of trouble, in the name of Jesus?

30th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on October 30, 1989

Readings: Sirach 35:12-14, 16-18; Paul to Timothy 4:6-8, 16-18; and Luke 18:9-14

Fr. Healy begins this homily by discussing the death of his beloved sister, Sally.  Through the experience of Sally’s death, the Healy family gatthered to share favorite family stories, including who among the many Healy children, was the favorite. In today’s gospel we are reminded that the least among us are loved most by God. Furthermore, Fr. Healy reminds us that we are to be the one that shows the marginalized that God loves them.  We must be God’s presence in this world to our brothers and sisters. Indeed, God demands this of us in our acts and deeds and we must lay aside our comparisons with others.

19th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Wisdom 18:6-9; Hebrews 11:1-2, 8-19; Luke 12:32-48

Originally delivered on August 13, 1989

In today’s homily, we hear about the family story of Abraham and Sarah and their son, Isaac. Through this story, we learn more about faith and are challenged to be like Abraham in listening to God, going to a place we don’t know, but are called to by God.  Then, in the gospel, we are told to let go, stop being so materialistic, and worried only about material things.  That is, we are to trust in God. We must ask ourselves if we truly trust in Jesus’s promise? Are we children of Abraham and Sarah in our actions? Finally, the gospel reminds us that “when much has been given a man, much will be required. More will be asked of a man to whom more has been entrusted.”

3rd Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on May 2, 1992

Readings: Acts of Apostles 5:27-32, 40-41; Revelation 5:11-14; John 21:1-19 or 21:1-14

In this homily, we hear of the tragedy of the riots in Los Angeles in 1992 and Fr. Healy’s struggle to understand the riots in light of the Easter allelujah that he felt during the season. From the first reading, we are reminded that we, like the apostles, sometimes may get into trouble doing the work that we are called to do. In the second reading, we hear again that Jesus will triumph. Finally, in the Gospel, through the story of Jesus meeting Peter fishing, we are reminded of Jesus’ forgiveness and our responsibility to serve others.  The racial riots in Los Angeles is another reason to know that we still have an unjust society and that we must confront those injustices if we say that we are true witnesses of Jesus. What are our present day events that show the injustices that remain?  How are we changing societal structures and ensuring that all people are included?  These are the questions that we must consistently ask ourselves as believers in Jesus’ Resurrection.

3rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on January 26, 1992

Readings: Nehemiah 8:2-4, 5-6, 8-10; Corinthians 12:12-30; Luke 1:1-4, 4:14-21

In this week’s homily, we are asked to imagine that we are a Jew waiting for the Messiah in order to fully comprehend the power of the Gospel story where Jesus announces that he is the Messiah for whom the Jews had been waiting.  We are asked  to think about the part of us that wants the responsibility of living The Good News to be for someone else, but not ourselves.  Today, in the second reading, we are reminded that we are part of the body of Christ.  There is no insignificant part of the body.  As such, we must be the living Christ to our sisters in brothers around the world.  We are anointed.  We are called.  We will never have the perfection of Jesus. We will be misunderstood, rejected, ignored, or even stopped in our attempts, but we must continue to try. 

 

 

1st Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on February 21, 1988

Readings: Genesis 9:8-15; Peter 3:18-22; Mark 1:12-15

In the first reading we are reminded of the story of Noah’s ark to be saved at the time of the flood. And yet, despite this flood, we hear that God saved one family and the animals because of His love for His people.  In return, we are to give glory to God for all that we have from God. We are responsible for God’s creation, including our sisters and brothers, the environment, and animals.