Challenge

25th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Wisdom 2:17-20; James 3:16-4:3; Mark 9:30-37

Originally delivered on September 18, 1988

In this week’s Gospel, we hear that to be first we must be last and be servant to all.  We hear today of a massacre in Haiti for the priest, Fr. Aristide, confronted those in power over the obvious injustices. When we say that we walk with Jesus, what are we saying and what does that mean that we will do to stand up for our hurting sisters and brothers?  We are reminded that even the disciples argued about who was the greatest among them, just like we can get caught up in our own issues of prestige.  And yet, we are called today to put that aside and really follow Jesus in being the servant to everyone. If not by us, then by whom?  If not now, when? 

24th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Isaiah 50: 4-9; James 2: 14-18; Mark 8:27-35

Originally delivered on September 11, 1988

We are asked if we would have liked to be in Peter’s shoes to be the first person to say to Jesus, “You are the Messiah.”  But then a few minutes later when Peter when Peter said what being a Messiah meant, he was called Satan.  We must each be ready to answer the question about who we think Jesus is.  Perhaps we might rephrase the question to be “Why have we gone to church today?”  Is it because of Jesus? For comfort, community, or consolation? What about to be challenged and confronted?

 

21st Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Joshua 24:1-2, 15-17, 18; Ephesians 5:21-32; John 6:60-69

Originally delivered on August 25, 1991

Fr. Healy starts this homily by explaining how his vocation to the priesthood began. While seduced by the smoke and incense, he explains that God, through Jesus, has seduced him inside so that He permeates Fr. Healy’s every thought and action. We, too, are called to live with Jesus in our hearts each and every day even if it is the way of the cross.

20th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Proverbs: 9:1-6; Ephesians 5:15-20; John 6:51-58

Originally delivered on August 14, 1994

In this week’s Gospel, Jesus again tells us that He is the Bread of Life.  In the first reading, Fr. Healy points out that God is referred to as feminine. Our thinking, therefore, is challenged by Jesus, in both the first and Gospel readings, to let Him be our food and drink so that we might respond in His Spirit to our current realities.

18th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Exodus 16: 2-4, 12-15; Ephesians 4:17, 20-24; John 6:24-25

Originally delivered on August 4, 1991

Today we are called to abandon our practical living and to believe and trust in God. In the first reading, we hear about Moses and manna in the desert.  In the Gospel, Jesus says that He is the bread of life.  Fr. Healy passionately preaches that we, as followers of Jesus, must have faith in God and share our treasures, whatever those may be, with our needy sisters and brothers. We are called to be radical, even revolutionary, from the order that is in place if we are to create a just world.

17th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Kings: 4:42-42; Ephesians 4:1-6; John 6:1-15

Originally delivered on July 24, 1988

Today’s Gospel is the miracle of the loaves and fishes feeding 5,000. We are reminded that through this miracle, Jesus shows us that we already have more than enough for the hungry and the hurting. The solution is in our hands for our world’s problems. Fr. Healy challenges us to be bold and share our treasures with our marginalized and hungry sisters and brothers, both as individuals and as a nation. Are we living our espoused values?

 

16th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Jeremiah 23: 1-6; Ephesians 2: 13-18; Mark 6: 30-34

Originally delivered on July 21, 1991

In today’s Gospel, we hear a continuation of last week’s mission.  Jesus welcomed back the disciples from their mission as messengers of the Gospel. We hear about two recent deaths – one young person taken due to violence and another elderly member of the parish. Fr. Healy challenges those marginalized, particularly black Americans, to stand up and not take the blame for their oppression, but demand leadership. We hear in the first reading from Jeremiah, “Woe to the shepherds who mislead and scatter the flock of my pasture.” In the second reason, we hear that Jesus calls us to unity with one another. Our greatest gift is to be the family of God. We cannot rest until we become a family with all of our sisters and brothers. Indeed, we are called to be the bearer of this message.