Cycle C

33rd Sunday of Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on November 19, 1989

Readings: Malachi 3:19-20; Thessalonians 3:7-12; Luke 21: 5-19

In this week’s Gospel, we hear Fr. Healy’s anger and passion regarding the murder of fellow priest, Segundo Montes, S.J., in El Salvador just three days before the homily was delivered.  He goes on to talk about what the financial realities were with Duquesne University and the Washington Office on Haiti.  We are reminded that ten years earlier, Archbishop Oscar Romero was also murdered because he fought for the poor.  He goes on to remind us that this week’s Gospel tells us that horrible things will happen, including death for some. Despite these things, we are called to bear witness and to stand up for our sisters and brothers. Indeed, we must bring light to every area of government and society where injustice exists.  Are we willing to get into a little bit of trouble, in the name of Jesus?

32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on November 8, 1992

 

Readings: Maccabees 7:1-2, 9-14; Thessalonians 2:16 -3:5; Luke 20:27-38 or 20-27 , 34-38

 

How does our conscience shape our actions? Are we, like the seven sons and their mother from the Book of Maccabees, willing to die for what we believe?  In today’s homily, we are reminded that we may have to take a stand for something which will become irrelevant at a later date.  Nonetheless, in the moment, we are called to follow our conscience.  We should pray dearly and act sincerely based on what our conscience tells us. On the issues of women priests, abortion, sexual orientation, divorce, and our economic systems, we must pray and ultimately follow our conscience.

31st Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on November 5, 1989

Readings: Wisdom 11:22 – 12:1; Thessalonians 1:11 -2:2; Luke 19: 1-10

The story of Zacchaeus, the wealthy tax collector and a short man, teaches us that we needn’t worry about things we cannot change, but rather change the things we can.  We can waste time and energy trying to change things that we might view as a challenge or problem rather than seeing those challenges as gifts from God to be used to bring justice and dignity to all God’s people.  In our collective diversity, God’s glory is made manifest. 

 

 

30th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on October 30, 1989

Readings: Sirach 35:12-14, 16-18; Paul to Timothy 4:6-8, 16-18; and Luke 18:9-14

Fr. Healy begins this homily by discussing the death of his beloved sister, Sally.  Through the experience of Sally’s death, the Healy family gatthered to share favorite family stories, including who among the many Healy children, was the favorite. In today’s gospel we are reminded that the least among us are loved most by God. Furthermore, Fr. Healy reminds us that we are to be the one that shows the marginalized that God loves them.  We must be God’s presence in this world to our brothers and sisters. Indeed, God demands this of us in our acts and deeds and we must lay aside our comparisons with others.

29th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on October 19, 1986

Readings: Exodus 17:8-13; Paul to Timothy 3:14 – 4:2; Luke 18:1-8

Prayer is always the lifting of the mind and thought with God. It is how we are in communion with God.  But prayer is more than just formal prayers. Being in relationship with our brothers and sisters, especially those hurting and in pain, is how we give praise to our God that created us and also be a people in prayer.  Whatever we do that is meant to harmonize us with God’s plan for us is prayer. In this week’s readings, we hear that even Moses’ arms needed support, just as we need others to help and support us. 

Read the Transcript: c29ot-10-19-86

28th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on October 12, 1986

Readings: Kings 5:14-17; Paul to Timothy 2:8-13; Luke 17:11-19

There is no doubt about it — God can cure all human suffering, but His use of power is limited to opportunities to encourage our faith. The Scripture tells us that for the foreigners, God was willing to heal them, in order to help us to increase our faith and believe more in the Lord. We are called to grow in faith each day.  We are reminded that in 1986, the similarities between lepresy and AIDS were so evident.  Then, and now, we are called to be loving to all people just as Jesus loved the ten lepers in today’s Gospel.  Our God is not merciful, but rather God is Mercy. In His image, we are called to bring love and compassion to all those suffering with human afflictions. 

Read the Transcript: c28ot-10-12-86

27th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on October 8, 1989
Readings: Habakkuk 1:2-3, 2, 2-4; Paul to Timothy 1:6-8, 13-14; Luke 17:5-10

In today’s Gospel we hear of the importance of faith and confidence in God.  The message in today’s liturgy is powerful and burdensome: the God in whom we believe, does not intervene in this world, but He gives us the strength for each of us to act to make the world a more just place.  Fr. Healy cites several examples of individuals that worked to address issues of homelessness, AIDS, and sexism. We are called to do the same, but not for reward, but because faith is its own reward.