Cycle C

3rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on January 26, 1992

Readings: Nehemiah 8:2-4, 5-6, 8-10; Corinthians 12:12-30; Luke 1:1-4, 4:14-21

In this week’s homily, we are asked to imagine that we are a Jew waiting for the Messiah in order to fully comprehend the power of the Gospel story where Jesus announces that he is the Messiah for whom the Jews had been waiting.  We are asked  to think about the part of us that wants the responsibility of living The Good News to be for someone else, but not ourselves.  Today, in the second reading, we are reminded that we are part of the body of Christ.  There is no insignificant part of the body.  As such, we must be the living Christ to our sisters in brothers around the world.  We are anointed.  We are called.  We will never have the perfection of Jesus. We will be misunderstood, rejected, ignored, or even stopped in our attempts, but we must continue to try. 

 

 

2nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on January 19, 1992

Readings: Isaiah 62:1-5; Corinthians 12:4-11; John 2:1-12

How will Isaiah’s words, “I will not be silent” propel us into action? In likely his most passionate homily, Fr. Healy reminds us to add our voices on behalf of the poor, especially those in Haiti, to bring about justice. We are reminded in this powerful homily of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King’s words: “We know through painful experience, that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor, but demanded by the oppressed…the question is not whether we will be extremists, but what kind of extremists we will be…”  We are asked to use our unique gifts from God, whatever those gifts might be, to be extremists to ensure that everyone will have a place at the table, making the prophesy of the Gospel come true.  We are each called.  How will we respond to that calling?

Baptism of the Lord

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Originally delivered on January 12, 1992

 

Readings: Isaiah 42:1-4, 6-7; Acts 10:34-38; Luke 3:15-16, 21-22

 

A Sacrament of initiation, Baptism, is more than a welcome to the Church. Baptism is an initiation into the family. In today’s homily, we are asked to acknowledge Baptism as a commissioning outward to share in the spirit of our family.  Everyone is family, and as such, we are asked to hold a world vision based on Jesus, who taught us tenderness toward each other and justice for all. As a family, we must embrace all people, without exception, and especially immigrants, refugees, and strangers.  All are welcome and all are one. Although we are baptized in water, we are also baptized in fire and spirit.  May God set us on fire to make the spirit of family alive in our world.

Christmas

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Originally delivered on December 24, 1988
Readings: Isaiah 62:1-5; Acts of the Apostles 13:16-17, 22-25; Matthew 1:1-25
In this Christmas message we hear of a story of a simple act rooted in selflessness that forever changed the life of another.  We’re also reminded of the power of believing.

 

4th Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 18, 1988

Readings: Micah 5:1-4; Hebrews 10:5-10; Luke 1:39-45

Elizabeth greets Mary as “the mother of my Lord.”  This Gospel reminds us that perhaps few of us are prophetic, like John the Baptist in last week’s reading, but many more are like Elizabeth. By accepting ourselves, as God has created us, we have the opportunity to bring God’s Grace to the world.  Through the simplicity of our roles and actions, we can make a difference in the world. By choosing life rather than death, light rather than darkness, and by caring for others rather than being judgmental, God’s presence is felt by others through us.

3rd Sunday of Advent

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Originally Delivered on December 11, 1988
Readings: Zephaniah 3:14-18; Philippians 4:4-7; Luke 3:10-18

John the Baptizer says to us that we must change our ways because Jesus is coming.  We might do well to be as fervent in our preparations for Jesus in our lives as John the Baptizer is.  At the very least, we must use only what we need, be just toward others, and make the world a little bit better for our sisters and brothers through simple acts of kindness and joy.

2nd Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 4, 1988
Readings: Baruch 5:1-9; Philippians 1:4-6,8-11; Luke 3:1-6

In anticipation of the coming of Jesus, a herald’s voice cries “Make ready the way of the Lord.” While recognizing that we live within an increasingly global village, we must start preparing the way by transforming our own neighborhoods. But we mustn’t stop there.  To “topple the mountains and fill in every valley,” we must look at the economic and political arrangements in our world that keep some poor and others wealthy, even if it makes us uncomfortable.

1st Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on November 27, 1988

Readings: Jeremiah 33:14-16; Thessalonians 3:12-4:2; Luke 21:25-28,34-36

Advent is a time of waiting for the birth of Jesus. What we do while waiting is worth examining. Do we seize the opportunity to improve our current condition and the quality of tomorrow? If we don’t take action to make tomorrow better, how will we ever explain this to ourselves and to God?

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33rd Sunday of Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on November 19, 1989

Readings: Malachi 3:19-20; Thessalonians 3:7-12; Luke 21: 5-19

In this week’s Gospel, we hear Fr. Healy’s anger and passion regarding the murder of fellow priest, Segundo Montes, S.J., in El Salvador just three days before the homily was delivered.  He goes on to talk about what the financial realities were with Duquesne University and the Washington Office on Haiti.  We are reminded that ten years earlier, Archbishop Oscar Romero was also murdered because he fought for the poor.  He goes on to remind us that this week’s Gospel tells us that horrible things will happen, including death for some. Despite these things, we are called to bear witness and to stand up for our sisters and brothers. Indeed, we must bring light to every area of government and society where injustice exists.  Are we willing to get into a little bit of trouble, in the name of Jesus?

27th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on October 8, 1989
Readings: Habakkuk 1:2-3, 2, 2-4; Paul to Timothy 1:6-8, 13-14; Luke 17:5-10

In today’s Gospel we hear of the importance of faith and confidence in God.  The message in today’s liturgy is powerful and burdensome: the God in whom we believe, does not intervene in this world, but He gives us the strength for each of us to act to make the world a more just place.  Fr. Healy cites several examples of individuals that worked to address issues of homelessness, AIDS, and sexism. We are called to do the same, but not for reward, but because faith is its own reward.