Healy Family Story

24th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on September 12, 1993

Readings: Sirach 27: 30-28:7; Romans 14: 7-9; Matthew 18: 21-35

In this week’s homily, we hear of the atrocity of a supporter of Haitian President Aristide being dragged out of a Mass being said by Fr. Antoine Adrien and murdered.  We are also reminded of the history taking place in Yugoslavia.  Despite these global injustices, and even with our personal pains and grievances, we are, as Christians, called to forgive, just as God forgives us.  Indeed, the message is clear: God is forgiveness.  What about you?

17th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on July 29, 1990

Readings: Kings 3:5, 7-12; Romans 8: 28-30; Matthew 13:44-52 or 13:44-46

Fr. Healy begins this homily with a few favorite Healy family stories. We are encouraged to treasure those things that are really valuable in the eyes of God. In the first reading, Solomon asks for understanding.  In the Gospel, we hear that “the reign of God is also like a dragnet thrown into the lake, which collected all sorts of things.”  We are challenged to think about whether we care more about people and human relationships over things, success, or fame? Do we subscribe to structures and agreements that keep some of our sisters and brothers marginalized?

1st Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on February 28, 1993

Readings: Genesis 2:7-9, 3:1-7; Romans 5:12-19 or 5:12, 17-19; Matthew 4:1-11

We all struggle with a God who is love and mercy who also permits pain, suffering, and evil within His creation.  But through Jesus, we know that we are redeemed.  In spite of and in the midst of all the meanness, madness, and idiocy of human behavior, we are loved and forgiven for our shortcomings.

7th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on February 21, 1993

Readings: Leviticus 19:1-2, 17-18; Corinthians 3:16-23; Matthew 5:38-48

In this homily, Fr. Healy retells the tragic story of the fire that struck his family’s home and its aftermath for the family. We are reminded that we must always forgive unconditionally.  Although this is very difficult, we have examples of parents,  including those of Jesus, whose children were killed by others.  We are called to forgive just as Mary and Joseph forgave.  In today’s readings we are also given encouragement to forgive.  In Leviticus, we hear the Lord say to Moses, “Be holy, for I, the Lord your God. am holy.  You shall not bear hatred for your brother in your heart.” Then, in the second reading, Paul says to the Corinthians that we are temples of a holy God.  We are challenged to let go of our hurts so that we might truly forgive.

30th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on October 30, 1989

Readings: Sirach 35:12-14, 16-18; Paul to Timothy 4:6-8, 16-18; and Luke 18:9-14

Fr. Healy begins this homily by discussing the death of his beloved sister, Sally.  Through the experience of Sally’s death, the Healy family gatthered to share favorite family stories, including who among the many Healy children, was the favorite. In today’s gospel we are reminded that the least among us are loved most by God. Furthermore, Fr. Healy reminds us that we are to be the one that shows the marginalized that God loves them.  We must be God’s presence in this world to our brothers and sisters. Indeed, God demands this of us in our acts and deeds and we must lay aside our comparisons with others.

26th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on September 20, 1992

Readings: Amos 6:1, 4-7; Paul to Timothy 6:11-16; Luke 16:19-31

We all have the same dilemma.  That is, if we really listen to the words of Jesus, it sounds impossible to follow him.  We are all probably, at our best, silent co-conspirators that keep poor people in their poverty. If we take today’s Scripture readings seriously, they are both challenging and somewhat frightening in their ramifications for how we live our lives. We are called, once again, not to be complacent when our sisters and brothers around the world are still hungry.  God is speaking to us today to not sit back and be complacent.  We should get restless and feel the frustration, as Jesus did, when he saw that some were cast aside and trampled on.  But, the sin in today’s Gospel is not being rich, but rather, being rich and indifferent to those around us.  

19th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Wisdom 18:6-9; Hebrews 11:1-2, 8-19; Luke 12:32-48

Originally delivered on August 13, 1989

In today’s homily, we hear about the family story of Abraham and Sarah and their son, Isaac. Through this story, we learn more about faith and are challenged to be like Abraham in listening to God, going to a place we don’t know, but are called to by God.  Then, in the gospel, we are told to let go, stop being so materialistic, and worried only about material things.  That is, we are to trust in God. We must ask ourselves if we truly trust in Jesus’s promise? Are we children of Abraham and Sarah in our actions? Finally, the gospel reminds us that “when much has been given a man, much will be required. More will be asked of a man to whom more has been entrusted.”