Healy Family Story

26th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on September 20, 1992

Readings: Amos 6:1, 4-7; Paul to Timothy 6:11-16; Luke 16:19-31

We all have the same dilemma.  That is, if we really listen to the words of Jesus, it sounds impossible to follow him.  We are all probably, at our best, silent co-conspirators that keep poor people in their poverty. If we take today’s Scripture readings seriously, they are both challenging and somewhat frightening in their ramifications for how we live our lives. We are called, once again, not to be complacent when our sisters and brothers around the world are still hungry.  God is speaking to us today to not sit back and be complacent.  We should get restless and feel the frustration, as Jesus did, when he saw that some were cast aside and trampled on.  But, the sin in today’s Gospel is not being rich, but rather, being rich and indifferent to those around us.  

2nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Isaiah 62:1-5; Corinthians 12:4-11; John 2:1-12 

Originally delivered on January 15, 1989

In this week’s Gospel we hear of the first miracle at the wedding of Cana. We are invited to see Mary as a symbol for the Church itself.  Furthermore, we are challenged to be like Mary and get involved.  And in the second reading, Paul tells us that each of us is uniquely gifted.  Do we believe it?  Are we brave enough to use that gift to make glorious things for God?  Anne Frank and Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. were both ordinary people.  We too are ordinary people.  How might we make our light shine as they did?

 

32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

Readings: Kings 17:10-16; Hebrews 9:24-28; Mark 12:38-44

Originally delivered on November 10, 1991

Fr. Healy begins this homily with a family story of his Aunt Kate.  In this Gospel from Mark we hear how to live, and not live, a religious life.  Indeed, we are called to give, like the widow, from our “substance” rather than just what is comfortable. We are therefore challenged to allow ourselves to respond to human situations not from what is practical, but what our hearts tell us to do.  Are we giving from our substance? If so, then we never have to fear how it looks to more practical people. We are already forgiven by God, but are we living as though we’ve heard Jesus’s message that our actions toward our sisters and brothers in need? 

 

 

5th Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on April 28, 1991

Readings: Acts 9:26-31; John 3:18-24; John 15:1-8

Today we are challenged to get more serious in our following of Jesus. We have to be ready for God to change our circumstances and see the world in a whole new light. Like Paul, we might even switch sides. In the epistle, we are reminded that we are to love one another as Jesus loves. We are called to “love in deed and in truth and not merely talk about it.”

4th Sunday of Easter

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Readings: Acts 4:8-12; John 3:1-2; John 10:11-18

Originally delivered on April 24, 1988

In today’s homily, Fr. Healy tells us that the second reading really touched him because we are called “children of God.” We are reminded that God loves us just as we are. Perhaps this is hard to believe because to do so requires us to love others as God already loves us.

2nd Sunday of Easter

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Readings: Acts 4:32-35; John 5:1-6; John 20: 19-31

Originally delivered on April 10, 1988

In this week’s Gospel, we are reminded that God’s presence will be obvious when we take care of our sisters and brothers.  When we forgive them, they will feel God’s presence. We are commissioned to be the Church.  We are the Easter people that must let the world know that there is still hope to be celebrated.

Epiphany

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Originally delivered on January 6, 1991

Readings: Isaiah 60: 1-6; Ephesians 3:2-3, 5-6; Matthew 2:1-12

Today we are invited to reflect on how Mary felt about the shepherds and magi visiting just after giving birth to Jesus. And yet, we are reminded that though we may be strangers with some, we are all family which requires us to examine our definition or understanding of family.  Perhaps it wasn’t easy for Mary to welcome the strangers, she set an example and welcomed them.  We are called, as members of the great family of God, to share the good news that God is Love and Mercy and we are all God’s children.