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Epiphany

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Originally delivered on January 4, 1987

Readings: Isaiah 60:1-6; Ephesians 3:2-3, 5-6; Matthew 2:1-12

In this homily on the Feast of the Epiphany, we hear that that most important line from the three readings is “God’s secret plan, as I have briefly described it, was revealed by the Spirit to the holy apostles and prophets.  It is no less than this: in Christ Jesus the Gentiles are now co-heirs with the Jews, members of the same body and sharers of the promise through the preaching of the gospel.”  As co-heirs, we must ask ourselves if we’ve also accepted the responsibility of sacrificing what we could have to ensure that our sisters and brothers have a place at the table?  Welcoming all, but especially the refugees and other foreigners, like the wise men were welcomed by the baby Jesus, is what we are called to do as Christians.

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Christmas

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Originally delivered on December 25, 1989

Readings: Isaiah 62:1-5; Acts 13:16-17, 22-25; Matthew 1:1-25

On this Christmas day, Fr. Healy teases us with the possible homilies that he might give us.  He reminds us that Jesus, as a baby, is like us as frail, frightened human being.  We are called to be love, forgiveness, and decency to a world terribly in need of these Godly gifts. Indeed, we are a privileged people, but we are also called to act in order to make a difference in His world.

4th Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 22, 1992

Readings: Isaiah 2:1-5; Romans 13:11-14; Matthew 24:37-44

In today’s Gospel, we are reminded of how Joseph acted in a manner that no one could understand, except someone that believed in God. We are reminded that those that left the greatest marks, were those that believed in their dreams. What would happen if each of us believed that God was in, around, and always with us?

Read the PDF transcript by clicking the link below.

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3rd Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 17, 1989

Readings: Isaiah 35:1-6, 10; James 5:7-10; Matthew 1:2-11

Today we are reminded to Rejoice!  Rejoice for our being prophets to bring Jesus’ Gospel to our sisters and brothers here on Earth. We are each called to be prophets despite our frailties, doubts, and even our sins.   It is in our infirmity that the Glory of God becomes more evident. So, today as we rejoice in the Good News, we are each challenged to be true prophets in our actions.

2nd Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 6, 1992

Readings: Isaiah 2:1-5; Romans 13:11-14; Matthew 24:37-44

In today’s homily, we are invited to take a mountain view.  We are challenged to go from the comfortable to someplace new from which to gain a new perspective. We hear in the the first reading of Isaiah’s vision of what might be although it seems as if his vision can never happen.  We are reminded that this vision can only be possible after we hear, respond, and commit ourselves to justice among our sisters and brothers. Are we waiting for God or others to do justice before we commit and act for justice?  What if people, because of us, stop dreaming?  Today, we’re invited to go to the mountaintop, get a new perspective, and then bring about a little less injustice in our world through our actions.

1st Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 3, 1989

Readings: Isaiah 2:1-5; Romans 13:11-14; Matthew 24:37-44

Now is the time for us to take action.  In a passionate homily, even more so than usual, Fr. Healy encourages us to be participants and seize the sacred moment, and to turn our swords into plowshares. Let us put on the armor of light that is Jesus Christ. Now is the hour, for us to work for peace, love, and fellowship with our sisters and bothers throughout the world. We are reminded of the martyrs from El Salvador and Nicaragua, including Archbishop Romero, who were slain in the name of peace.  Let the blood of these martyrs to propel each of us to be peacemakers in our time.

33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on November 16, 1986

 

Readings: Malachi 3:19-20; Thessalonians 3:7-12; Luke 21: 5-19

 

In today’s Gospel, we are once again reminded that we must follow Jesus, despite the fact that many obstacles will confront us precisely for what we believe and do based on those beliefs.  We, in a sense, bear a burden as Christians.  We are reminded of the 1986 Pastoral Letter on Catholic Social Teaching and the U.S. Economy, Haiti, and affordable housing as current day happenings (then and now) that challenge us to act on behalf of our sisters and brothers, the poor.