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33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Daniel 12:1-3; Hebrews 10:11-14, 18; Mark 13: 24-32

Originally delivered on November 13, 1988

What is our personal apocalypse? How have we transformed these times and maintained our courage and hope for the future. Jesus tells us in this day’s Gospel, that God is always with us. We will have trials in our lives, but we are comforted because Jesus is our Savior and already embracing us.

33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Daniel 12:1-3; Hebrews: 10:11-14, 18; Mark 13:24-32

Originally delivered on November 3, 1991

In this week’s homily, Fr. Healy tells us a fairytale, The Kingdom of Love, that illustrates the spirit of of our God, who is Love. We are reminded that God loves each and every one of us, just as we are.  We must risk believing how much God loves his people. 

32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

Readings: Kings 17:10-16; Hebrews 9:24-28; Mark 12:38-44

Originally delivered on November 10, 1991

Fr. Healy begins this homily with a family story of his Aunt Kate.  In this Gospel from Mark we hear how to live, and not live, a religious life.  Indeed, we are called to give, like the widow, from our “substance” rather than just what is comfortable. We are therefore challenged to allow ourselves to respond to human situations not from what is practical, but what our hearts tell us to do.  Are we giving from our substance? If so, then we never have to fear how it looks to more practical people. We are already forgiven by God, but are we living as though we’ve heard Jesus’s message that our actions toward our sisters and brothers in need? 

 

 

31st Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Deuteronomy 6:2-6; Hebrews 7:23-28; Mark 12:28-34

Originally delivered on November 3, 1991

In this week’s homily, Fr. Healy tells us that it’s so simple and yet so difficult to understand the commandment to Love God and our neighbor as ourself. Perhaps our biggest challenge is that we don’t love ourselves.  We are passionately reminded that God loves each of us as we are! When we love ourself, then perhaps we will then be able to truly help our sisters and brothers.

 

30th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Jeremiah 31:7-9; Hebrews 5:1-6; Mark 10:46-52 

Originally delivered on October 27, 1991

In the first reading, we hear an expression of hope among the Jews for the coming of the Messiah.  In the gospel, we heat that the Messiah has come in Jesus. Through Him, we are asked to renounce money, comfort, possessions, things, power, prestige, place, etc. We are called to give up security, give to the poor, and follow Jesus.  We should long to be a servant and friend to the poor and marginalized. Indeed, we must see and act as every other person is our sister or brother. Do we really want to see as Jesus sees?

 

30th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Jeremiah 31:7-9; Hebrews 5:1-6; Mark 10:46-52

Originally delivered on October 23, 1988

Today, we are asked to consider what God is saying to us in this week’s readings.  In this first reading we hear what will be given to the chosen people.  Then, the gospel tells of a public healing of a blind man. We must struggle in our imperfection and wrestle with our conscience to try to bring about the kingdom of God in our midst. If we look at the present reality with the vision that God provides in the scriptures, then we will begin to agitate with our imperfect criticism to bring the world more in line with Jesus’s plan for the world. We may be walking in blindness, but we must remember that Jesus is always with us. What do we want Jesus to do for us?  Do we want to see?

29th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Readings: Isaiah 53:10-11; Hebrews 4:14-16; Mark 10:35-45

Originally delivered on October 20, 1991

In today’s homily, Fr. Healy reminds us that the not only does God exist, but that God loves us as we are.  Jesus became human, and as it says in the second reading, he was tempted but never sinned, and yet, we are always forgiven.  Indeed, Fr. Healy passionately insists that God doesn’t just have love and mercy, but is love and mercy. And yet, we are not able to merely rest on that love because, as we hear in the gospel, we also have a responsibility to care for our sisters and brothers.  We are called to let go of earthly things (e.g., money and power) and be servants to others until everyone in the family has a fair share of God’s blessings.