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6th Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on May 16, 1993
Readings: Acts 8:5-8, 14-17; Peter 3:15-18; John 14:15-21
In this homily, Fr. Healy describes to us what it must have been like for the disciples after Jesus’s death, including their hopes, doubts, fears, and challenges.  In today’s Gospel, the disciples, like us, are challenged again to know that Jesus is with us through the Holy Spirit. Indeed, we are challenged to experience the Christ in our sisters and brothers.

5th Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on May 9, 1993

Readings: Acts 6:1-7; Peter 2: 4-9; John 14:1-12

In today’s Gospel we are reminded about our own Christian challenge through the disciple Thomas.  Fr. Healy reminds us that we are a priestly people called to be His consecrated people on earth, both in the Gospels and in Vatican II.  We must seek, therefore, to bring harmony wherever there is strife throughout the world. Perhaps, like Thomas, we prefer to be confused, or to hope that others, including the Church hierarchy, will solve the world’s problems.  But we are holy people, a royal nation, to give back all that is His.

4th Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on May 6, 1990

Readings: Acts of the Apostles 2:14, 36-41; Peter 2:20-25; John 10:1-10

Again today we hear about the Good Shepherd and his sheep. Fr. Healy invites us to wonder why that one sheep might have left the flock.  Could the flock have made it impossible to fit in?  But in this day’s readings, we hear that Jesus is the gatekeeper.  Others do not the have the right to keep some of the sheep out of the flock. Therefore, we have a responsibility to be like Jesus and always welcome others, and perhaps especially, the one sheep that has wondered off because of how the flock treats him or her.

4th Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on May 2, 1993

Readings: Acts of the Apostles 2:14, 36-41; Peter 2:20-25; John 10:1-10
In this homily, Fr. Healy asks us which one of us wants to be referred to as sheep.  Any yet, the metaphor is used in today’s Gospel.  We are challenged to acknowledge just how dependent we are for God’s help, guidance, and Grace through Jesus. If we are open to His word, then we can hear Him and make courageous choices in our present world.  We are asked to “do what Jesus would do” when facing economic, social and even personal questions.  If we are members of Jesus’s flock, we must always return hatred and bitterness with kindness, compassion, love, and a willingness to let ourselves go in the name of peace and truth.

3rd Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on April 25, 1993

Readings: Acts 2:14, 22-28; Peter 1:17-21; Luke 24: 13-35
Fr. Healy asks us to explore our own road to Emmaus; how we fail to see the risen Christ in those around us. We are challenged to open our hearts to those that are different from us.

2nd Sunday of Easter

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Readings: Acts 2:42-47; Peter 1:3-9; John 20:1931

Originally delivered on April 26, 1987

In this week’s Gospel, the Risen Jesus appears to the disciples, but Thomas was not present and only believed when Jesus appeared to Thomas and showed him His wounds.  Just like us, Thomas had his doubts.  And yet, the words that Thomas proclaimed to Jesus were powerful, “My Lord and my God.”  In the first reading from the Acts of the Apostles, we hear that the apostles provided for one another based on their individual needs.  Indeed, we must be there for our brothers and sisters. When we search for the Risen Christ, do we find those in need or are we only aligning ourselves the oppressors?  We are, in fact, called to be the sign of the Risen Christ in our deeds.  Through all of these trials, like Thomas, we will have our doubts, but we must persist because Jesus will be with us.

Easter

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Readings: Genesis: 1:1-2.2; Genesis 22:1-18; Matthew 28:1-10

Originally delivered on April 11, 1993

On this Easter Sunday, we are encouraged to be a joyful people despite our human condition or frailty.  We must remember that Jesus’s apostles loved Him so much and yet disappointed Him so much.  There are atrocities in our world, but we must remember that there have been some Easter people in our midst and have translated their hallelujahs into deeds. We must do the same.