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2nd Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 9, 1990

Readings: Isaiah 40:1-5, 9-11; Peter 3:8-14; Mark 1:1-8

Today, we are asked to look at why we might characterize or dismiss the prophets?  In the readings, we hear of two prophets, Isaiah and John the Baptist. Both give us a message to “Prepare ye the way of the Lord.”  We are called to examine ourselves and see if we are an obstacle to God’s plan of peace. Are we willing to pay the price for being peacemakers? If we take Isaiah and John the Baptizer seriously, we must acknowledge the radical call to nothing less than conversion as things as they are and a turning around to be as God wants them to be. Indeed, we are confronted, through this homily, to be like Christ in our responses to the troubles and evils in our world. That is, we are called to love and not avenge. We must bring peace where there is war; kindness and understanding where there is blindness to the truth.  We may be sinners, but we are called to be prophets.

2nd Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 6,1987

Readings: Isaiah 40:1-5, 9-11; Peter 3:8-14; Mark 1:1-8

Are we too busy or preoccupied to be called to level mountains and fill valleys? Will we be spectators or will we, in fact, work to ensure justice and fairness?  We are called to prepare the way of the Lord.  We hear in today’s readings we hear that “In the Lord’s eyes, one day is a thousand years and a thousand years are as a day.”  That is, justice may not be done in our time, but in God’s time which is a mystery to us.  The only question is if we will work to be part of God’s plan for justice on earth.

 

1st Sunday in Advent

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Originally delivered on December 2, 1990

Readings: Isaiah 63: 16-17. 19; 64:2-7; Corinthians 1:3-9; Mark 13:33-37

At the beginning of Advent, we are, in effect, saying thank you Jesus and come again among us. He comes and renews us in each Eucharist and when two or three are gathered in His name.  Advent is a time to acknowledge God’s presence in our lives which gives us strength to carry on.  But it is also a time to remember that we should be on guard and ready for HIs coming again.  At the time of the original delivery, the US was weighing the possibility of the Gulf War.  We are asked to consider how our political enemies are also people of God. 

 

 

Christ the King

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Originally delivered on November 22, 1987

Readings: Ezekial 34:11-12, 15-17; Corinthians 15:20-26, 28; Matthew 25: 31-46

In today’s Gospel, Fr. Healy says that Jesus tells us the bottom line.  That is, we will be judged by how we treated the “least” among us. Do we put things before the needs of our sisters and brothers?  Indeed, we are called to do more for the marginalized, poor, and ostracized. We are all supposed to stand as equals in front of our God.

33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on November 15, 1987

Readings: Ezekial 34:11-12, 15-17; Corinthians 15:20-26, 28; Matthew 25: 31-46

We are reminded that the Scriptures are written in a cultural context and that we must look through this context and look for the deeper meaning.  In the first reading from Ezekial, we are challenged to reach out to the poor and give what we can.  In the Gospel, we are told that we should use our unique gifts to help serve God to advance the spirit and the purpose of the Gospel. We are urged to make those actions now, not to wait.

32nd Sunday IN Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on November 8, 1987

Readings: Wisdom 6:12-16; Thessalonians 4:13-17 or 4:13-14; Matthew 25: 1-13

In today’s homily, Fr. Healy reminds us that Jesus teaches us to not put things off.  We are also reminded that the disciples believed that Jesus would come again within their lifetimes. We are implored not to lose the sense of urgency that Jesus is coming.  We must act and be the Christ to our sisters and brothers.

31st Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on October 31, 1993

Readings: Malachi 1:14-2:2, 8-10; Thessalonians 2:7-9, 13; Matthew 23:1-12

In this homily, Fr. Healy discusses the significance of Vatican II, the Church in Haiti, and those that are marginalized by the institutional Church. He characterizes Vatican II as revolutionary and a calling for us to be part of the universal Church in both spirit and responsibility. We are reminded that our conscience is the ultimate law of morality because it is our sacred inner core where we meet God.  We must remember that Jesus responded that the two greatest commandments were to love God and to love our neighbor as ourselves.