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6th Sunday of Easter

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Readings: Acts 10:25-26, 34-35, 44-48, John 4:7-10, John 15:9-17

Originally delivered on May 8, 1994

In today’s homily, we are reminded that we are called to love one another – sometimes easy and other times difficult. God is Love.  When we live in love then we live in God and God in us.  We are not to set a measure on what makes others lovable.  We must love everyone, just as God loves each of us. We are therefore called to be more forgiving with others. Indeed, in today’s Gospel, we hear: “There is no greater love than this: to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.”  

3rd Sunday of Easter

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Readings: Acts 5:12-16; Revelation 1:9-11, 12-13, 17-19; John 20:19-31

Originally delivered on April 17, 1994

In this homily, we are reminded that our sins are always forgiven.  Indeed, God is Mercy and Redemption.  It’s so amazing that it’s difficult for many of us to believe.  Nonetheless, we must try to reflect God’s forgiveness in how we treat one another.  We must love one another, just as God loves us.

 

Easter

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Reading: Matthew 28:1-10 

Originally delivered on March 31, 1991 (Scheduled to be posted on April 4, 2021)

As we sing our Easter alleluias, how can we acknowledge the despair that exists by many in our world? Perhaps our alleluia can be strength for those hurting. 

1st Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on March 4, 1990

Readings: Genesis 2:7-9, 3:1-7; Romans 5:12-19 or 5:12, 17-19; Matthew 4:1-11

In today’s readings we hear about the Garden of Eden, Jesus’ forty days in the desert, and His temptation by the devil.  We are reminded that God created the right order of things in His creation of the Garden of Eden, but like Jesus, we each experience our time in the desert, struggling with every demon.  We would do well to remember that Jesus went before us and will always be with us, as God’s people. But with Jesus’ support and love, we are each called to re-create the right order of things.  This means that we must experience the desert and our temptations, such as our desire for things and power, and trust in our God. To do this requires our penance, but most importantly, responsibility to make the future different.

5th Sunday of Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on February 8, 1987

Readings: Isaiah 58:7-10 (73A); 1 Corinthians 2:1-5; Matthew 5:13-16

In this week’s homily, Fr. Healy reflects on his experiences as a missionary in Tanzania.  He hopes for a day when every person would feel and believe that would believe that they “are the light of the world” and “the salt of the earth.” He invites us to think about to whom Jesus spoke those words.  Just as He did then, He is indeed speaking to us, as the ordinary people.  This means that we who have heard these words are meant to be a difference to a suffering world. We are reminded of the responsibilities of being called and the examples that we’ve seen in our parish and community of taking action.

4th Sunday of Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on January 31, 1993

Readings: Zephaniah 2:3; 3:12-13; 1 Corinthians 1:26-31; Matthew 5:1-12a

In this homily, we remember the passing of Justice Thurgood Marshall.  The first African-American member of the Supreme Court, he challenged the status quo and represented the poor and marginalized.  Perhaps he was considered a thorn in the side of the establishment, just as Jesus must have been considered by His contemporaries. In this week’s Gospel, we hear Jesus from the mountain, just as Moses gave the ten commandments from the mount, giving us the Beatitudes which were so very different in nature than the straightforward ten commandments.  But who are the poor in Spirit? Poverty in Spirit surely means genuine dependence on and trust in the Lord.  But being poor in Spirit also may mean those with material wealth who stand with the poor, the disadvantaged, and the marginalized. In doing so, we will be rich in God’s love.

 

Baptism of the Lord

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Originally delivered on January 10, 1993

Readings: Isaiah 42:1-4, 6-7; Acts 10:34-38; Matthew 3:13-17

Through a touching Healy family story, we glean new insight about why Jesus was baptized. Perhaps he wanted to identify with us, as much as possible — with our difficulties, shame, and sin which is all washed away in Baptism.  He wanted to be one with us in our struggle.  When we are at our most frail, Jesus, through His own Baptism, has shown us that He is truly with us.  Just as we should be with our oppressed sisters in brothers, especially those that don’t yet know about Jesus.

 

Baptism of the Lord

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Readings: Isaiah 42: 1-4, 6-7; Acts: 10:34-38; Mark 1:7-11

Originally delivered on January 13, 1991

How do we give others power or authority over our lives?  When we are baptized in Jesus, it is a proclamation that we are joined with Jesus as Lord. No one is Lord except Jesus.  Therefore, we must stand with Jesus when contemplating actions, policies, laws, etc. Our challenge is to keep asking ourselves where Jesus is leading us. 

Baptism of the Lord

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Readings: Isaiah 42: 1-4, 6-7; Acts: 10:34-38; Mark 1:7-11

Originally delivered on January 10, 1988

On this Feast of the Baptism of the Lord, Fr. Healy invites us to reflect on what it means to us to be initiated into an exclusive club of some type. What about our initiation into the Church?  Indeed, everyone is welcomed into the Body of Christ. To be a member of Christ’s Church, we are called to look outward, embracing our sisters and brothers.  To be a Catholic is to be a part of the world.  We are called to work to bring the vision of Christ to our world. 

3rd Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 13, 1992

Readings: Isaiah 2:1-5; Romans 13:11-14; Matthew 24:37-44

In this week’s homily, Fr. Healy argues that Bible is a revolutionary message on behalf of the poor. In the first ready, Isaiah is picturing the glory of our Lord.  We are asked to consider the plight of the poor, such as a Somali woman, hearing those words. Would we feel abandoned or swindled by our sisters and brothers? Perhaps for this reason it was dangerous to have slaves or the poor learn to read for fear of them reading the Bible.  It is meant to be an energizer to the the poor and oppressed to stand up to claim their rightful place as God’s children. Indeed, this could be an historic moment for each of us, to decide to give the message to the poor and then to work to make that message come true for our marginalized sisters and brothers.