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Holy Trinity

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Originally delivered on May 25, 1986

Readings: Proverbs 8:22-31; Paul to the Romans 5:1-5; John 16:12-15

Today we are asked to pause to try to grasp the very nature of our God. Fr. Healy reminds us of the story of St. Augustin’s attempt to understand God. Indeed, we may only catch glimpses of God.  Every creature on Earth is a reflection of God, who is neither male or female. Our task is to keep falling deeper in love with God, by holding and understanding every person as best we can because she or he is a reflection of God.

Pentecost

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Originally delivered on June 7, 1992

Readings: Acts of the Apostles 2:1-11; Paul to the Corinthians 12:3-7, 12-13; John 20:19-23

Fr. Healy reminds us that we have already received the Holy Spirit.  Perhaps not in the wind or the fire, but in the light and life of the diversity of our sisters and brothers.  Indeed, there are people throughout the world waiting for the fire within us to make a difference in their lives.  He reminds us of political events in Yugoslavia, Czechoslovakia, Thailand, Cambodia, China, and Haiti where people are waiting for the power of the Holy Spirit.  The message of Pentecost is not to be still and wait for God to save, but rather that we must be fire on the earth.

5th Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on May 17, 1992

Readings: Acts of the Apostles 14: 21-27, Revelation 21:1-5, and John 13:31-33, 34-35

In this week’s Gospel, we hear the story of the Last Supper, and specifically, how Judas missed it because he was too interested in the money that he was to receive for betraying Jesus. At each Eucharist, we are invited by Jesus to dedicate ourselves to others, just as Jesus dedicated Himself to us. We are asked how we are loving our sisters and brothers, just as Jesus loved us.  We are challenged to ask ourselves how are we helping the people of Haiti, what are we doing to stop the continuation of capital punishment, or how we are changing the lives of anyone in need. 

4th Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on May 10, 1992

Readings: Acts of the Apostles 13:14, 43-52, Revelation 7:9, 14-17, and John 10: 27-30

Fr. Healy begins by explaining his belief about the two basic elements of a homily: an eternal, unchanging truth that runs through the Scriptures, and the marriage between that message and the immediacy, or contemporary application, to our present reality.  From the day’s reading, we know that Jesus loves us, we will triumph if we follow Him, and living the Gospel can get us into trouble. In the current reality of 1992, we hear how Fr. Healy deals with understanding the Los Angeles riots.  We are reminded that there are no “throw away” people in Jesus’ family and that we must confront the system that holds some down for the advantage of others, even if this means that we will get in trouble for doing so.

3rd Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on May 2, 1992

Readings: Acts of Apostles 5:27-32, 40-41; Revelation 5:11-14; John 21:1-19 or 21:1-14

In this homily, we hear of the tragedy of the riots in Los Angeles in 1992 and Fr. Healy’s struggle to understand the riots in light of the Easter allelujah that he felt during the season. From the first reading, we are reminded that we, like the apostles, sometimes may get into trouble doing the work that we are called to do. In the second reading, we hear again that Jesus will triumph. Finally, in the Gospel, through the story of Jesus meeting Peter fishing, we are reminded of Jesus’ forgiveness and our responsibility to serve others.  The racial riots in Los Angeles is another reason to know that we still have an unjust society and that we must confront those injustices if we say that we are true witnesses of Jesus. What are our present day events that show the injustices that remain?  How are we changing societal structures and ensuring that all people are included?  These are the questions that we must consistently ask ourselves as believers in Jesus’ Resurrection.

2nd Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on April 2, 1989

Readings: Acts of the Apostles 5: 12-16; Revelation 1:9-11, 12-13, 17-19; John 20:19-31

In this week’s homily, we’re invited to rethink what it meant for Thomas to doubt the existence of the risen Lord until Thomas saw Jesus for himself.  What if Thomas is the hero in the story?  Perhaps Thomas was the only one who recognized that to be the Messiah required Jesus to suffer human pain and suffering and Thomas was acknowledging that human suffering of our Messiah by asking to see his wounds and put his hands in His flesh. Furthermore, it might be that this Gospel story tells us not so much about Thomas’ disbelief, but rather that we can experience a relationship with our God by being in relationship with our sisters and brothers, reaching out to them, and touching their lives in a similar way to how Thomas touched Jesus’ wounds and hurts.

Easter

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Originally delivered on April 16, 1995

Readings: Acts 10:34, 37-43; Colossians 3:1-4; Corinthians 5:6-8; John 20:1-9

Fr. Healy begins this last homily at Our Lady Queen of Peace by retelling some favorite funny stories.   He reminds us that we cannot let the meanness and sadness of the “bad guys” to overcome us.  We must find hope in the Risen Christ.  We are not alone in our pain and sorry, but Jesus’s pain on the cross, is so that we can bear our pain.  We must not give up.  We are called to be the Easter people and sing alleluia for ourselves and for our sisters and brothers.  We cannot give in to those that would silence us.  We must always stand up for the truth. We are also called to forgive those that have wronged us.