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Holy Family

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Originally delivered on December 29, 1990

Readings: Sirach 3:2-6, 12-14; Colossians 3:12-21; Luke 2:22-40 or 2:22, 39-40

Through old family stories, we are invited to see justice and family in a new light. Who do we consider family? Do we extend the same actions to others that we would for our “family” members?  Aren’t we aren’t all sisters and brothers as children of the same God? We are reminded of the powerful words of Paul from the second reading today: “Because you are God’s chosen ones, holy and beloved, clothe yourselves with heartfelt mercy, with kindness, humility, meekness, and patience.  Bear with one another; forgive whatever grievances you have against one another.  Forgive as the Lord has forgiven you.  Over all these virtues put on love, which binds the rest together and makes them perfect. Christ’s peace must reign in your hearts, since as members of the one body you have been called to that peace.”

Christmas (Midnight Mass)

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Originally delivered on December 25, 1990 (Midnight Mass)

Readings: Isaiah 9:1-6; Titus 2:11-14; Luke 2:1-14

In this Midnight Mass homily, Fr. Healy reminds us that we must work with and for Jesus if we are to see justice, love, and family in our world.

4th Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 20, 1987

Readings: Samuel 7:1-5, 8-11, 16; Romans 16: 25-27; Luke 1:26-38

Fr. Healy invites us to try to see how the first reading and the Gospel might be related.  In the first reading, we hear of King David, who wanted to build a great temple for God.  Instead, God says that he wants a temple in the hearts of His people.  And then in the Gospel, we hear Mary say that she is the living temple of God. She fulfills all prophecies and also makes us confront ourselves to likewise be a temple of God to our sisters and brothers.

4th Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 23, 1990

Readings: Samuel 7:1-5, 8-11, 16; Romans 16: 25-27; Luke 1:26-38

On this fourth Sunday of Advent, Fr. Healy starts by reminiscing about his own mother as well as Mary the Mother of God.  Indeed, we are reminded how courageous and powerful Mary really is in God’s plan, despite how we have fashioned her as a calm, quiet woman.  We are challenged to allow Mary to be the one to challenge us to really invite Jesus into our lives.

3rd Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 16, 1990

Readings: Isaiah 61:1-2, 10-12; Thessalonians 5:16-24; John 1:6-8, 19-28

Today we are challenged with the question: “Who are you?”  We are called today to answer, like John, by saying “I am nobody; just a Christian trying to prepare the way for the Lord.” Indeed, Isaiah, John the Baptist, and Paul all paid the greatest price for their beliefs. The Church asks us to rejoice, even in the midst of injustices, because of the kind of God we have.  In Jesus, God is forever calling us to let go of our fear and selfishness and to embrace our sisters and brothers in all their pain and sorrow.  We are anointed to give our whole being to the poor and oppressed.

 

2nd Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 9, 1990

Readings: Isaiah 40:1-5, 9-11; Peter 3:8-14; Mark 1:1-8

Today, we are asked to look at why we might characterize or dismiss the prophets?  In the readings, we hear of two prophets, Isaiah and John the Baptist. Both give us a message to “Prepare ye the way of the Lord.”  We are called to examine ourselves and see if we are an obstacle to God’s plan of peace. Are we willing to pay the price for being peacemakers? If we take Isaiah and John the Baptizer seriously, we must acknowledge the radical call to nothing less than conversion as things as they are and a turning around to be as God wants them to be. Indeed, we are confronted, through this homily, to be like Christ in our responses to the troubles and evils in our world. That is, we are called to love and not avenge. We must bring peace where there is war; kindness and understanding where there is blindness to the truth.  We may be sinners, but we are called to be prophets.

2nd Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 6,1987

Readings: Isaiah 40:1-5, 9-11; Peter 3:8-14; Mark 1:1-8

Are we too busy or preoccupied to be called to level mountains and fill valleys? Will we be spectators or will we, in fact, work to ensure justice and fairness?  We are called to prepare the way of the Lord.  We hear in today’s readings we hear that “In the Lord’s eyes, one day is a thousand years and a thousand years are as a day.”  That is, justice may not be done in our time, but in God’s time which is a mystery to us.  The only question is if we will work to be part of God’s plan for justice on earth.