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Passion Sunday

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Originally delivered on April 4, 1993

Readings: Isaiah 50: 4-7; Philippians 2:6-11; Matthew 26:14-27, 66

How can we ever understand the people’s choice of releasing Barabbas over Jesus?  Fr. Healy challenges us to see similar situations in our lives where we, the people, choose Barrabas. Indeed, when we live in a society that maximizes a right or benefit for a few at the expense of the many, we are living in a time when the people still choose Barabbus.  Indeed, the Passion is still with us today.  We are encouraged to recognize, acknowledge, and repent for our collective sins, when we chose Barabbus, even in our complicity. Jesus, the Son of god, is in the most desperate person among us.  The choice is ours how we will respond.

5th Sunday of Lent

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Readings: Ezekial 37:12-14, Romans 8:8-11, John 11:1-45

Originally delivered on March 28, 1993

In this Gospel of Jesus raising Lazarus from the dead, Jesus is speaking to us in his encounter with Martha, that we are givers and takers of life. Perhaps, we are being challenged today to be there to help our sisters and brothers in need. It is our responsibility, as Christians, to breathe new life into others. The priorities of the Gospel must be our priorities in life.  Current events call us to be moved to tears, as Jesus was, and then to act on behalf of the poor and marginalized.  The shame of our past silence and the guilt of our past conspiracies, demand of us that we take the place of Jesus to be bearers of life, where people are free and live without oppression. We must involve ourselves in others’ struggles, just as Jesus did with Martha.

4th Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on March 21, 1993

Readings: Samuel 16:1, 6-7, 19-13; Ephesians 5:8-14; John 9:1-41

In this day’s Gospel, we hear that Jesus singles out a blind man to be the most favored by God’s love and power.  Indeed, Jesus wants us to have a new vision and to see things very differently.  We are called to see that we are part of a large family of God. Fr. Healy challenges us to re-examine the US role in central America and the role men in keeping women marginalized.

3rd Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on March 14, 1993

Readings: Exodus 17:3-7; Romans 5:1-2, 5-8; John 4:5-42 or 4:5-15, 19-26, 39, 40-42

In today’s Gospel we are reminded that water is indeed vital to life.  In the first reading, the people who are angry at God are not a people who had never benefitted from the goodness of God and yet they complained.  In the Gospel story we hear of the water that lasts forever and yet the Samaritan woman does not fully understand Jesus’s words. In the second reading, we hear Paul remind of us of God’s love for us because Christ died for us.  Jesus died and we are redeemed.  That is our reality and yet, our challenge is to believe that we are already saved.

 

2nd Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on March 7, 1993

Readings: Genesis 12:1-4; Timothy 1:8-10; Matthew 17:1-9

In today’s Gospel, we, like the apostles, get a glimpse of the glory of God.  We hear today that our God will bring us from our deepest depths to our highest heights.  Perhaps, during this season of Lent, we need to encouragement to keep going by hearing and seeing the glory of God.  It’s a respite that reignites our passion to work for God’s vision here on earth by reaching out and loving our sisters and brothers, without exception.

1st Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on February 28, 1993

Readings: Genesis 2:7-9, 3:1-7; Romans 5:12-19 or 5:12, 17-19; Matthew 4:1-11

We all struggle with a God who is love and mercy who also permits pain, suffering, and evil within His creation.  But through Jesus, we know that we are redeemed.  In spite of and in the midst of all the meanness, madness, and idiocy of human behavior, we are loved and forgiven for our shortcomings.

7th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on February 21, 1993

Readings: Leviticus 19:1-2, 17-18; Corinthians 3:16-23; Matthew 5:38-48

In this homily, Fr. Healy retells the tragic story of the fire that struck his family’s home and its aftermath for the family. We are reminded that we must always forgive unconditionally.  Although this is very difficult, we have examples of parents,  including those of Jesus, whose children were killed by others.  We are called to forgive just as Mary and Joseph forgave.  In today’s readings we are also given encouragement to forgive.  In Leviticus, we hear the Lord say to Moses, “Be holy, for I, the Lord your God. am holy.  You shall not bear hatred for your brother in your heart.” Then, in the second reading, Paul says to the Corinthians that we are temples of a holy God.  We are challenged to let go of our hurts so that we might truly forgive.