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2nd Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on March 15, 1992

Readings: Genesis: 15:5-12, 17-18; Letter of Paul to Philippians 3:17-4:1 or 3:20-4:1: Luke 9:28-36

In this homily, Fr. Healy reminds us that our perspective is important in understanding events.  In this week’s Gospel, Jesus takes the apostles up the mountain to see a glimpse of the Glory of God.  Fr. Healy points out that rather than stay on that mountain, Jesus leads Peter, James, and John back down the mountain to be with and to care for those living below.

5th Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on April 5, 1992

Readings: Isaiah 43: 16-21; Philippians 3: 8-14; John 8:1-11

In this week’s homily, we hear of others’ reactions to Fr. Healy’s penchant for speaking emphatically and his rationale for becoming a lawyer.  But more importantly, he discusses the law as it relates to today’s Scripture readings.  In the Gospel about the woman about to be stoned for adultery, we are reminded how Jesus showed compassion to her as well as breaking the law when He says, “Let the one among you who has no sin be the first to cast a stone at her.”  He shares with us, his thoughts on various legal issues of the day.  He compels us to be called by today’s Gospel to remember that we must follow the law of love if we are to imitate Christ.

4th Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on May 10, 1992

Readings: Acts of the Apostles 13:14, 43-52, Revelation 7:9, 14-17, and John 10: 27-30

We Fr. Healy’s belief about the two basic elements of a homily: an eternal, unchanging truth that runs through the Scriptures, and the marriage between that message and the immediacy, or contemporary application, to our present reality.  From the day’s reading, we know that Jesus loves us, we will triumph if we follow Him, and living the Gospel can get us into trouble. In the current reality of 1992, we hear how Fr. Healy deals with understanding the Los Angeles riots.  We are reminded that there are no “throw away” people in Jesus’ family and that we must confront the system that holds some down for the advantage of others, even if this means that we will get in trouble for doing so.

14th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on June 25, 1992

Readings: Isaiah 66: 10-14, Paul to the Galatians 6:14-18; Luke 10:1-12, 17-20 or 10:1-9

 

3rd Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on May 2, 1992

Readings: Acts of Apostles 5:27-32, 40-41; Revelation 5:11-14; John 21:1-19 or 21:1-14

In this homily, we hear of the tragedy of the riots in Los Angeles in 1992 and Fr. Healy’s struggle to understand the riots in light of the Easter allelujah that he felt during the season. From the first reading, we are reminded that we, like the apostles, sometimes may get into trouble doing the work that we are called to do. In the second reading, we hear again that Jesus will triumph. Finally, in the Gospel, through the story of Jesus meeting Peter fishing, we are reminded of Jesus’ forgiveness and our responsibility to serve others.  The racial riots in Los Angeles is another reason to know that we still have an unjust society and that we must confront those injustices if we say that we are true witnesses of Jesus. What are our present day events that show the injustices that remain?  How are we changing societal structures and ensuring that all people are included?  These are the questions that we must consistently ask ourselves as believers in Jesus’ Resurrection.

Christ the King

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Originally delivered on November 21, 1993

Readings: Ezekial 34:11-12, 15-17; Corinthians 15:20-26, 28; Matthew 25: 31-46

In this week’s Gospel, we hear the challenge to all people, but especially Christians, that we are called to care for our sisters and brothers. We are reminded that there is but one law — to love.  To love with all that we have without exception.  Although it’s simply stated, it’s very difficult for us to live, but that is both our calling and our challenge.  But Fr. Healy goes on to encourage us to look deeper into why some of our sisters and brothers are hungry, hurting, or marginalized.

33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on November 14, 1993

Readings: Proverbs 31:10-13, 19-20, 30-31; Thessalonians 5:1-6; Matthew 25:14-30 or 25: 14-15, 19-20

We are reminded in today’s Gospel that God gives each of us a Divine gift to each of us that is unique to each of us.  But our task is to take the risk of faith to make more of it. If God is, in fact, love and mercy, we must believe, in the depth of our being, that we are already in God’s love and mercy and see ourselves in that context.  We are encouraged to ask ourselves not why we got certain gifts and not others, but what we are doing with the gifts that we have been given.  If we trust in God and invest in our talents, we will increase our gifts exponentially as a reflection of God Himself.