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25th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on September 24, 1989

Readings: Amos 8:4-7; Paul to Timothy 2:1-8; Luke 16: 1-13 or 16:10-13

We cannot serve God and money.  We cannot put things in front of people.  People must always be more important and we must never put ourselves in a better position at the expense of our sisters and brothers. Through the second reading, we are told to pray for all the people in positions of power and authority over others.

24th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on September 17, 1989

Readings: Exodus 32:7-11, 13-14; Paul to Timothy 1:12-17; Luke 15:1-32 or 15:1-10

In the first reading, we hear of God’s anger toward the people of Egypt for their sinfulness.  But in the Gospel reading, we learn, through the story of the Prodigal Son, of Jesus’ forgiveness and love for all of us, despite our sinfulness and shortcomings. We are forgiven and loved as we are, not as we might be, because God is love, mercy, and forgiveness.  As forgiven people, we need only believe that we are forgiven.  But perhaps before we can believe that we are forgiven, we need to forgive others.  

23rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on September 10, 1989

Readings: Wisdom 9:13-18; Paul to Philemon 9-10, 12-17; Luke 14:25-33

In this Gospel, we are reminded of what it takes for us to be followers of Jesus.  We must be ready to sacrifice ourselves, as Archbishop Romero did, for our sisters and brothers. Unless we embrace the cross each and every day, we cannot be a disciple of Jesus.  Although alone we cannot change a corrupt system or arrangement, we can each do something to change the situation for the good of all.  If we feel overwhelmed by this challenge from the Gospel, then we can look to the first reading in the book of Wisdom and remember that God sent his Holy Spirit from to enlighten and empower us to be instruments of peace, justice, and love.

16th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on July 23, 1989

Readings: Gn 18:1-10a; Col 1:24-28; Luke 10:38-42

 

7th Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on May 31, 1992

Readings: Acts of the Apostles 7: 55-60; Revelation 22: 12-14, and John 17: 20-26

God is love.  Our loving, parental God sent His Son, Jesus, to all the people of the earth to lead them back to His Father’s house to celebrate together forever.  So simple, yet our challenge is to find its meaning for us in our hectic, challenging lives.  Stephen understood this message and gives witness of this understanding to others.  We, as Christians, are called to be like Stephen, to love one another as our God loves us.  Like Stephen, our witness may cost us our lives, but we are called to give witness by showing our passion for people, our brothers and sisters, especially those we might call our enemies. 

2nd Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on April 2, 1989

Readings: Acts of the Apostles 5: 12-16; Revelation 1:9-11, 12-13, 17-19; John 20:19-31

In this week’s homily, we’re invited to rethink what it meant for Thomas to doubt the existence of the risen Lord until Thomas saw Jesus for himself.  What if Thomas is the hero in the story?  Perhaps Thomas was the only one who recognized that to be the Messiah required Jesus to suffer human pain and suffering and Thomas was acknowledging that human suffering of our Messiah by asking to see his wounds and put his hands in His flesh. Furthermore, it might be that this Gospel story tells us not so much about Thomas’ disbelief, but rather that we can experience a relationship with our God by being in relationship with our sisters and brothers, reaching out to them, and touching their lives in a similar way to how Thomas touched Jesus’ wounds and hurts.

Easter

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Originally delivered on March 26, 1989

In this homily, Fr. Healy tells us stories from past Easters, including many about his mother, and the lessons that he learned from those experiences.  He reminds us that our laughter lifts us and that we might do well to take ourselves a little less seriously.  We are the people called by God to bring joy and laughter to a weeping world.