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Passion Sunday

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Originally delivered on March 19, 1989

On this Sunday, we celebrate the Passion of our Lord.  Each of us, in our way, is destined to experience our own “way of the cross” through our disappointments, suffering, and frustrations.  Through these experiences of hurt and fear, we are reminded that we can get closer to understanding the love Jesus has for us by his own human suffering at Calvary.  By commingling His humanity with his divinity, Jesus experiences and shares our suffering. He is with and in us. We try to deepen our passion and reverence for our Lord, Jesus Christ.  This year, let us realize that our passion is also His. 

5th Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on March 12, 1989

Readings: Isaiah 43: 16-21; Philippians 3: 8-14; John 8:1-11

As a follow-up to last week’s parable of the Prodigal Son, this week’s Gospel is the story of Jesus’ forgiveness of the woman about to be stoned for adultery.  He asks those that are without sin to cast the first stone.  In this homily, we are reminded first of God’s all encompassing love and forgiveness for us, and second that the ultimate norm of morality is the individual conscience reflecting, as best that person can, the will of God. Jesus’ example in this Gospel story is that we must have love and compassion to bring personal forgiveness and understanding of others.

4th Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on March 5, 1989

Readings: Joshua 5:9, 10-12; Corinthians 5:17-21; Luke 15:1-3, 11-32

In this famous parable of the Prodigal Son, we hear that Fr. Healy depends on this story because of it reminds us of God’s immeasurable and unconditional love, always forgiving, and always accepting us as HIs children. We can reflect on this story and see which son we might be, but we should also remember that God’s love is infinite and He bestows it on each of us. We don’t need to be perfect, but only willing to accept God’s forgiveness, compassion, and love. Jesus laid down His life for us, as the fatted calf, to celebrate our return to the Father.

3rd Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on March 22, 1992

Readings: Exodus 3:1-8, 13-15; Corinthians 10:1-6, 10-12; Luke 13:1-9

In this passionate homily, Fr. Healy discusses his vision of what preaching is or should be. He says that “like the Eucharist, it is both consolation and comfort while also being confrontation and challenge to bring about the conversion to God.” He goes on to explain that the task of the homilist is to take the eternal truth and give it a contemporary context — an immediacy for us each Sunday. From the first reading, we are reminded that God is beyond our imagination, but also present with us each day, as He was for Moses in the burning bush. But we are reminded that each people hear God’s words from their own perspective, a perspective that we would do well to consider, even if it is not our own perspective. We are asked to make a new effort to reject easy interpretations of God’s words and to honor our diversity in hearing others’ perspectives.  From the Gospel, we are reminded through Jesus’ parable of the fig tree, that God always loves us,  always forgives us, and always has hope for us.

2nd Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on February 19, 1989

Readings: Genesis: 15:5-12, 17-18; Letter of Paul to Philippians 3:17-4:1 or 3:20-4:1: Luke 9:28-36

In this Gospel, Jesus goes up the mountain with Peter, John, and James.  On the mountain, Jesus appears in all HIs glory accompanied by Moses and Elijah. On this second Sunday of Lent, through this Gospel reading, we are reminded of the glorious future to come. But we are reminded to be a people profoundly grateful to God for every great memory that we have, but we also should be determined to make the dream of Jesus come true for tomorrow. 

1st Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on February 12, 1989

Readings: Deuteronomy 26:4-10; Letter of Paul to the Romans 10:8-13; Luke 4:1-13

On this first Sunday of Lent, Fr. Healy talks about tithing and it’s importance as a practical need to care for our brothers and sisters. We are reminded by the Gospel reading that we should not be tempted by material security, desire for power over others, or relinquishing our responsibility to take action to improve our human condition. Through charity, especially when it is not just from our surplus, we show our love by caring for the poor, the needy, and the desperate.  

6th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on February 16, 1992

Readings: Jeremiah 17:5-8; Corinthians 15:12, 16-20; Luke 6:17, 20-26

In today’s Gospel, we are reminded of Jesus’ words “But woe to you rich, for your consolation is now.” As a member of one of the wealthiest nations, we are asked to look at our role in keeping the current arrangements that keep some people poor and hungry. We are also asked to think of marriage as an opportunity for two people to give themselves and their lives to their union as an expression of God Himself.