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1st Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on February 12, 1989

Readings: Deuteronomy 26:4-10; Letter of Paul to the Romans 10:8-13; Luke 4:1-13

On this first Sunday of Lent, Fr. Healy talks about tithing and it’s importance as a practical need to care for our brothers and sisters. We are reminded by the Gospel reading that we should not be tempted by material security, desire for power over others, or relinquishing our responsibility to take action to improve our human condition. Through charity, especially when it is not just from our surplus, we show our love by caring for the poor, the needy, and the desperate.  

6th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on February 16, 1992

Readings: Jeremiah 17:5-8; Corinthians 15:12, 16-20; Luke 6:17, 20-26

In today’s Gospel, we are reminded of Jesus’ words “But woe to you rich, for your consolation is now.” As a member of one of the wealthiest nations, we are asked to look at our role in keeping the current arrangements that keep some people poor and hungry. We are also asked to think of marriage as an opportunity for two people to give themselves and their lives to their union as an expression of God Himself. 

5th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on February 9, 1992

Readings: Isaiah 6:1-2, 3-8; Corinthians 15:1-11 or 15:3-8,11; Luke 5:1-11

Although we are not worthy, we are called to be the Good News. In today’s Gospel, we hear that Peter is moved by the power of Jesus and then became a fisher of men and women.  Each of us, although unworthy, are called by God to use our talents in our vocation. We are reminded of the examples of Rep. Mickey Leland and Fr. Antoine Adrien who answered their calls to work towards ending hunger, poverty, and unjust government arrangements.  We are called to speak out and challenge the injustices that we see in our local communities and in the world.  Originally delivered in 1992, the issues of Haiti and healthcare are passionately given to us as examples of injustices that we can do something about.  Ironically, perhaps more than then, these issues and injustices still exist today. We aren’t worthy but we are forever called by Jesus  to do something.

Epiphany

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Originally delivered on January 8, 1989

Readings: Isaiah 60:1-6; Ephesians 3:2-3, 5-6; Matthew 2:1-12

Christmas is not complete until Epiphany when we welcome others, foreigners as the Magi where, to know of the Good News of Jesus.  Our universal Catholic Church is not complete until all are invited to share of the promise of the Gospel.  We celebrate the spirit of Christmas when we share ourselves with all of God’s people.  When we don’t embrace all people, regardless of our differences, we are not only depriving them, but are also depriving ourselves of part of the beauty of God’s creation.

Mary, Mother of God

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Originally delivered on January 1, 1989

Readings: Numbers 6:22-27; Galatians 4:4-7; Luke 2:16-21

Everyone is invited to say “Amen” to God’s calling.  The beauty of Mary’s glory is her willingness to say “Amen” to God’s calling to bring forth Jesus to be made human through her. May her example challenge us to be a part of God’s plan for the world. 

4th Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 18, 1988

Readings: Micah 5:1-4; Hebrews 10:5-10; Luke 1:39-45

Elizabeth greets Mary as “the mother of my Lord.”  This Gospel reminds us that perhaps few of us are prophetic, like John the Baptist in last week’s reading, but many more are like Elizabeth. By accepting ourselves, as God has created us, we have the opportunity to bring God’s Grace to the world.  Through the simplicity of our roles and actions, we can make a difference in the world. By choosing life rather than death, light rather than darkness, and by caring for others rather than being judgmental, God’s presence is felt by others through us.

3rd Sunday of Advent

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Originally Delivered on December 11, 1988
Readings: Zephaniah 3:14-18; Philippians 4:4-7; Luke 3:10-18

John the Baptizer says to us that we must change our ways because Jesus is coming.  We might do well to be as fervent in our preparations for Jesus in our lives as John the Baptizer is.  At the very least, we must use only what we need, be just toward others, and make the world a little bit better for our sisters and brothers through simple acts of kindness and joy.