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16th Sunday in Ordinary Time

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Originally delivered on July 23, 1989

Readings: Gn 18:1-10a; Col 1:24-28; Luke 10:38-42

 

7th Sunday of Easter

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Originally delivered on May 31, 1992

Readings: Acts of the Apostles 7: 55-60; Revelation 22: 12-14, and John 17: 20-26

God is love.  Our loving, parental God sent His Son, Jesus, to all the people of the earth to lead them back to His Father’s house to celebrate together forever.  So simple, yet our challenge is to find its meaning for us in our hectic, challenging lives.  Stephen understood this message and gives witness of this understanding to others.  We, as Christians, are called to be like Stephen, to love one another as our God loves us.  Like Stephen, our witness may cost us our lives, but we are called to give witness by showing our passion for people, our brothers and sisters, especially those we might call our enemies. 

Easter

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Originally delivered on March 26, 1989

In this homily, Fr. Healy tells us stories from past Easters, including many about his mother, and the lessons that he learned from those experiences.  He reminds us that our laughter lifts us and that we might do well to take ourselves a little less seriously.  We are the people called by God to bring joy and laughter to a weeping world.  

Passion Sunday

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Originally delivered on March 19, 1989

On this Sunday, we celebrate the Passion of our Lord.  Each of us, in our way, is destined to experience our own “way of the cross” through our disappointments, suffering, and frustrations.  Through these experiences of hurt and fear, we are reminded that we can get closer to understanding the love Jesus has for us by his own human suffering at Calvary.  By commingling His humanity with his divinity, Jesus experiences and shares our suffering. He is with and in us. We try to deepen our passion and reverence for our Lord, Jesus Christ.  This year, let us realize that our passion is also His. 

3rd Sunday of Lent

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Originally delivered on March 22, 1992

Readings: Exodus 3:1-8, 13-15; Corinthians 10:1-6, 10-12; Luke 13:1-9

In this passionate homily, Fr. Healy discusses his vision of what preaching is or should be. He says that “like the Eucharist, it is both consolation and comfort while also being confrontation and challenge to bring about the conversion to God.” He goes on to explain that the task of the homilist is to take the eternal truth and give it a contemporary context — an immediacy for us each Sunday. From the first reading, we are reminded that God is beyond our imagination, but also present with us each day, as He was for Moses in the burning bush. But we are reminded that each people hear God’s words from their own perspective, a perspective that we would do well to consider, even if it is not our own perspective. We are asked to make a new effort to reject easy interpretations of God’s words and to honor our diversity in hearing others’ perspectives.  From the Gospel, we are reminded through Jesus’ parable of the fig tree, that God always loves us,  always forgives us, and always has hope for us.

Epiphany

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Originally delivered on January 8, 1989

Readings: Isaiah 60:1-6; Ephesians 3:2-3, 5-6; Matthew 2:1-12

Christmas is not complete until Epiphany when we welcome others, foreigners as the Magi where, to know of the Good News of Jesus.  Our universal Catholic Church is not complete until all are invited to share of the promise of the Gospel.  We celebrate the spirit of Christmas when we share ourselves with all of God’s people.  When we don’t embrace all people, regardless of our differences, we are not only depriving them, but are also depriving ourselves of part of the beauty of God’s creation.

Mary, Mother of God

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Originally delivered on January 1, 1989

Readings: Numbers 6:22-27; Galatians 4:4-7; Luke 2:16-21

Everyone is invited to say “Amen” to God’s calling.  The beauty of Mary’s glory is her willingness to say “Amen” to God’s calling to bring forth Jesus to be made human through her. May her example challenge us to be a part of God’s plan for the world. 

3rd Sunday of Advent

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Originally Delivered on December 11, 1988
Readings: Zephaniah 3:14-18; Philippians 4:4-7; Luke 3:10-18

John the Baptizer says to us that we must change our ways because Jesus is coming.  We might do well to be as fervent in our preparations for Jesus in our lives as John the Baptizer is.  At the very least, we must use only what we need, be just toward others, and make the world a little bit better for our sisters and brothers through simple acts of kindness and joy.

2nd Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on December 4, 1988
Readings: Baruch 5:1-9; Philippians 1:4-6,8-11; Luke 3:1-6

In anticipation of the coming of Jesus, a herald’s voice cries “Make ready the way of the Lord.” While recognizing that we live within an increasingly global village, we must start preparing the way by transforming our own neighborhoods. But we mustn’t stop there.  To “topple the mountains and fill in every valley,” we must look at the economic and political arrangements in our world that keep some poor and others wealthy, even if it makes us uncomfortable.

1st Sunday of Advent

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Originally delivered on November 27, 1988

Readings: Jeremiah 33:14-16; Thessalonians 3:12-4:2; Luke 21:25-28,34-36

Advent is a time of waiting for the birth of Jesus. What we do while waiting is worth examining. Do we seize the opportunity to improve our current condition and the quality of tomorrow? If we don’t take action to make tomorrow better, how will we ever explain this to ourselves and to God?

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